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Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.



 
 
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  #31  
Old December 12th, 2008, 07:31 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
Lawrence Akutagawa
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 462
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.


"Frank Slootweg" wrote in message
b.home.nl...
[Re-added rec.travel.australia+nz because of the references to Oz (and I
don't believe in splitting up running discussions, unless there is a
very good reason). Of course anyone is free to think/act otherwise.]

Lawrence Akutagawa wrote:
[...]

Just for your edification - in California the sales tax (about 8.25%,
depending on where in the state) is already included in the quoted per
gallon price of gasoline. A number of years ago it was excluded from the
quoted price such that the tax was calculated subsequently as per all
other
taxable purchases. But no longer.


"tax", you pushed yet another one of my buttons (Perhaps that Sharx35
dude was right after all!?).

The tax thingie is rather confusing, needlessly complex, and, AFAICT,
has no advantages for the customer.

In most - but not all - cases, tax was excluded. As you say, the
percentage depends on the location and probably also on the type of
product/service. If you're buying one or a few products, it's hard to
impossible to give the shop attendant the exact amount or to (try to)
get as little change as possible back, until the cash register has
calculated how much you own. That is a nuisance, only takes addtional
time, and I see no advantage (*Is* there any advantage?).

Now that is interesting. Throughout California, all taxes are included in
the per gallon price such that what you pay - strictly for gas - is what is
displayed on the pump. So if the pump says the purchase is for $20.50, then
you pay $20.50 for gas at the register. Of course if you pick up some odds
and ends (snacks, etc.) at the register you will have the sales tax added
onto the nominal price of those items. That pump price, by the way, does
include federal and state fuel taxes - which are separate from the sales
tax. And to make things even more murky, that sales tax is calculated not
just on the cost of the fuel, but on those federal and state fuel taxes as
well...at least it did back when the sales tax was excluded from the pump
price. A label on the pump itself details the various fuel taxes per
gallon.

And it is always a good idea when driving an unfamiliar car for the first
time to check out all the controls - including the one releasing the gas
tank lid - before driving off. It is rather dicey to have to find the
windshield wiper control while going 70 mph in a sudden downpour at
night.


Yeah, I normally do that, at least when there's some light, which
there (much) wasn't for our first rental.

One time, after driving from SFO airport to somewhere in Silicon
Valley, I found myself in front of the motel, unable to get the key out
of the ignition. Had to push some unkown button, which European cars
didn't/don't have. Quite annoying and embarrasing after a light flight
from Europe.

I didn't check the gas tank lid, but I filled up early and we had the
nice lady in the mirror, hadn't we!?

Hope you had a good time and saw some things different than from where
you
are.


We had and did. If anything was even remotely 'familiar' it was Joshua
Tree NP, Mojave NP and Death Valley NP, and it was only somewhat similar
to the things we love in Australia, so we just had a cheaper - and sadly
enough much shorter - trip, than our 'normal' trips to/in Australia. Our
daughter asked "So the US is your new Australia?". Well it isn't, but
it's beautiful as well and comparisons are equally sillay as unfair.

I trust you were able to range as far north as Bodie and perhaps as
far east as Zion. You next go, try working in Bryce, Capitol Reef,
Arches,
Canyonlands, Dead Horse Point, Goblin Valley, Mesa Verde, Monument
Valley,
etc. You won't regret doing so.


(Without looking them up,) Most of the places you mention don't ring a
bell. To be clear, we visited only California (and a tiny bit (Pahrump)
of Nevada) and only a *part* of CA (see above).

Do a net search of some of the places I named. Particularly if you like
nature, you'll like visiting those places the next trip here. In fact, you
can make a two week or so loop from Las Vegas visiting those areas. One
example - if you've enjoyed the scenery in those old Westerns (particularly
those John Wayne movies like Stagecoach, The Searchers, Fort Apache, She
Wore a Yellow Ribbon, etc.) you'll like and appreciate Monument Valley. A
bit more modern are the beginning scenes of Back to the Future Part III,
filmed also in Monument Valley.


  #32  
Old December 12th, 2008, 07:37 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
mcdonaldREMOVE TO ACTUALLY REACH [email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 25
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.

Lawrence Akutagawa wrote:

I trust you were able to range as far north as Bodie and perhaps as
far east as Zion. You next go, try working in Bryce, Capitol Reef,
Arches,
Canyonlands, Dead Horse Point, Goblin Valley, Mesa Verde, Monument
Valley,
etc. You won't regret doing so.

(Without looking them up,) Most of the places you mention don't ring a
bell. To be clear, we visited only California (and a tiny bit (Pahrump)
of Nevada) and only a *part* of CA (see above).




"those places" are "just" east of where you were in California. They
are past the southern tip of Nevada over in (mostly) Utah.

They are the "high desert" that is so iconic of the American west.
You know, the big red sandstone formations. Ultra spectacular.

Doug McDonald
  #33  
Old December 12th, 2008, 07:42 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
Mike O'Sullivan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 428
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.

Frank Slootweg wrote:
Mike O'Sullivan wrote:
Frank Slootweg wrote:
Hmmm! Before going to the US, I looked at AT&T's and T-Mobile USA's
websites. I didn't find anything like that on the AT&T site (Don't get
me started on AT&T sites.), and the T-Mobile USA site specifically said
that you could get SIM-only only via their website (and because that
required a US ship-to address, that was no option (not counting the
poorer (than AT&T) coverage)).

So now I'm the proud owner of a beautiful, but totally useless
(outside the US), AT&T GoPhone Nokia 2610 phone [1]. It cost me all of
US$ 19.99 (without tax, mind you (Don't get me started on the
without-tax thingie.)), so I'm not complaining. *And* it includes a charger
which is 110-240VAC (not 240VAC-only), so I can use it everywhere for
all my Nokia phones (albeit with plug-adapters, which are needed
anyway)!

I use an unlocked Nokia.
and I've never had any trouble in Canada buying a Fido SIM card.


Very interesting, but I wasn't and we weren't talking about Canada,
was I / were we!? :-)


It's North America, but if the information is uninteresting, feel free
to ignore it.
  #34  
Old December 12th, 2008, 08:26 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
Frank Slootweg
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 275
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.

"mcdonaldREMOVE wrote:
Frank Slootweg wrote:

11. Americans don't realize that you don't *have* to 'deep' fry fish.

Americans do, however, realize that if you don't want fried fish, you
shouldn't seek out resturants that sell only fried fish.


My point (which you snipped) was/is that there *are* no other
restaurants (in those areas). So apparently many/most Americans *do* want/
tolerate such 'food'.


If you are reffering to 395, I certainly remember places to
get good fish in both Lone Pine and Bishop.


With "in those areas", I was referring to the coastal places I
mentioned, specifically Morro Bay (just above San Luis Obispo) and
Fisherman's Warf in San Francisco.

*Fisherman*'s Warf and mostly crappy (deep fried) fish? A rather
strange combination, I would think! Case in point: We had
some rather decent (grilled) fish (swordfish, salmon etc. shrimps) in a
restaurant at Fisherman's Warf, but when the waitress gave us our menus,
she said that today's special was salmon. When we asked if it was fried,
she said yes! Sigh!

On 395 we stayed in Bridgeport (i.e. before Bishop). We had deep fried
stuff there, but it was just a simple, mostly take-away place, so we
can't complain about that, and the deep fried fish wasn't that bad.
Actually it was the best of the few times we had it.

We also stayed in Lone Pine, twice. First time we didn't even look for
fish, but had some very nice pizzas (Mind your own bloody business,
Alan! :-)). I can't go into details about our second stay because that
would reveal too much information in this public forum. (However, you
can probably put two and two together, and come up with something quite
close or equal to four.)
  #35  
Old December 12th, 2008, 08:34 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
Frank Slootweg
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 275
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.

Mike O'Sullivan wrote:
Frank Slootweg wrote:
Mike O'Sullivan wrote:
Frank Slootweg wrote:
Hmmm! Before going to the US, I looked at AT&T's and T-Mobile USA's
websites. I didn't find anything like that on the AT&T site (Don't get
me started on AT&T sites.), and the T-Mobile USA site specifically said
that you could get SIM-only only via their website (and because that
required a US ship-to address, that was no option (not counting the
poorer (than AT&T) coverage)).

So now I'm the proud owner of a beautiful, but totally useless
(outside the US), AT&T GoPhone Nokia 2610 phone [1]. It cost me all of
US$ 19.99 (without tax, mind you (Don't get me started on the
without-tax thingie.)), so I'm not complaining. *And* it includes a charger
which is 110-240VAC (not 240VAC-only), so I can use it everywhere for
all my Nokia phones (albeit with plug-adapters, which are needed
anyway)!
I use an unlocked Nokia.
and I've never had any trouble in Canada buying a Fido SIM card.


Very interesting, but I wasn't and we weren't talking about Canada,
was I / were we!? :-)


It's North America, but if the information is uninteresting, feel free
to ignore it.


I think the Canucks (sp?) would probably take offense at the "North
America" classification! :-)

But seriously, please feel free to post anything you like or/and to
ignore me. After all, this is Usenet, isn't it, so anything goes. I just
thought it was funny that you responded to a posting with subject "...
US ..." and splattered all over with "US[A]" this, "US[A]" that, but gave a
non-US related response. But then again, we Dutch are easily pleased.
  #36  
Old December 12th, 2008, 11:35 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
Don Kirkman[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.

It seems to me I heard somewhere that Lawrence Akutagawa wrote in
article :

"Frank Slootweg" wrote in message
. nb.home.nl...
[Re-added rec.travel.australia+nz because of the references to Oz (and I
don't believe in splitting up running discussions, unless there is a
very good reason). Of course anyone is free to think/act otherwise.]


Lawrence Akutagawa wrote:
[...]


Just for your edification - in California the sales tax (about 8.25%,
depending on where in the state) is already included in the quoted per
gallon price of gasoline. A number of years ago it was excluded from the
quoted price such that the tax was calculated subsequently as per all
other
taxable purchases. But no longer.


"tax", you pushed yet another one of my buttons (Perhaps that Sharx35
dude was right after all!?).


The tax thingie is rather confusing, needlessly complex, and, AFAICT,
has no advantages for the customer.


In most - but not all - cases, tax was excluded. As you say, the
percentage depends on the location and probably also on the type of
product/service. If you're buying one or a few products, it's hard to
impossible to give the shop attendant the exact amount or to (try to)
get as little change as possible back, until the cash register has
calculated how much you own. That is a nuisance, only takes addtional
time, and I see no advantage (*Is* there any advantage?).


Now that is interesting. Throughout California, all taxes are included in
the per gallon price such that what you pay - strictly for gas - is what is
displayed on the pump. So if the pump says the purchase is for $20.50, then
you pay $20.50 for gas at the register. Of course if you pick up some odds
and ends (snacks, etc.) at the register you will have the sales tax added
onto the nominal price of those items. That pump price, by the way, does
include federal and state fuel taxes - which are separate from the sales
tax. And to make things even more murky, that sales tax is calculated not
just on the cost of the fuel, but on those federal and state fuel taxes as
well...at least it did back when the sales tax was excluded from the pump
price. A label on the pump itself details the various fuel taxes per
gallon.


And fuel taxes tend to remain high, since the rationale is to dedicate
the revenues to construction and maintenance of motorways. In times
of falling revenue and climbing costs there is pressure to use some
portion of the fuel tax money for other purposes, though it is usually
"borrowed" rather than reappropriated.
--
Don Kirkman

  #37  
Old December 13th, 2008, 02:51 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
sharx35
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 803
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.



"Frank Slootweg" wrote in message
b.home.nl...
Mike O'Sullivan wrote:
Frank Slootweg wrote:
Mike O'Sullivan wrote:
Frank Slootweg wrote:
Hmmm! Before going to the US, I looked at AT&T's and T-Mobile
USA's
websites. I didn't find anything like that on the AT&T site (Don't
get
me started on AT&T sites.), and the T-Mobile USA site specifically
said
that you could get SIM-only only via their website (and because that
required a US ship-to address, that was no option (not counting the
poorer (than AT&T) coverage)).

So now I'm the proud owner of a beautiful, but totally useless
(outside the US), AT&T GoPhone Nokia 2610 phone [1]. It cost me all
of
US$ 19.99 (without tax, mind you (Don't get me started on the
without-tax thingie.)), so I'm not complaining. *And* it includes a
charger
which is 110-240VAC (not 240VAC-only), so I can use it everywhere for
all my Nokia phones (albeit with plug-adapters, which are needed
anyway)!
I use an unlocked Nokia.
and I've never had any trouble in Canada buying a Fido SIM card.

Very interesting, but I wasn't and we weren't talking about Canada,
was I / were we!? :-)


It's North America, but if the information is uninteresting, feel free
to ignore it.


I think the Canucks (sp?) would probably take offense at the "North
America" classification! :-)


I just happen to BE a Canadian who does NOT take offense at the term "North
America".
You surly, thin-skinned, America-phobic European assholes should grow some
thicker
skins to match your thick skulls. If you don't like "North American"
culture, then stay the ****
out of this newsgroup or stay in some limp-wristed Euro group. Or, simply,
FOAD. Anyone with any
brains moved from Europe a LONG time ago.






But seriously, please feel free to post anything you like or/and to
ignore me. After all, this is Usenet, isn't it, so anything goes. I just
thought it was funny that you responded to a posting with subject "...
US ..." and splattered all over with "US[A]" this, "US[A]" that, but gave
a
non-US related response. But then again, we Dutch are easily pleased.


  #38  
Old December 13th, 2008, 02:52 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
John Kulp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,535
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.

On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 13:05:52 +0100, Frank Slootweg
wrote:


4. American petrol/gas stations charge what they bloody well like.

While American petrol/gas prices are still ridiculously low compared
to Oz/Europe, prices vary by upto a *factor* of two within a short
distance, sometimes even a few miles or even less. I realize that
there's hardly any tax part in the price, so it's mostly 'cost', but
the real cost can't vary that much within such a small area.


That's what happens when you have free markets that are not
monopolized. You get a choice.


That the same in Europe/Oz, but the tax component is *so* high that
the differences in end-price are relatively (i.e. percentage-wise)
small. I.e. with taxes upto 70 odd percent, you will only see a
six-seven percent difference max in end-prices.


Well, if you like prices all the same, go to Espanola, NM. Every gas
station is town has the exact same price. Probably all owned by the
same family.


5. Americans don't quite grasp what the 'G' in GSM stands for.

They apparently think it means 'the whole world except us', so they
use a different, incompatible frequency.
Luckily our son has more mobile phones than underpants, so he gave
us - no less than three - 'old' multi-band ones. Problem solved, at
least we *thought* so.


Funny, I have one I bought here that works anywhere in the world.


Sorry, but I don't follow! Didn't I say the exact same thing? I.e. my
(son's) phone also "works anywhere in the world". The fact that I *can*
buy a phone that *doesn't* work anywhere in the world, doesn't mean I
*cannot* buy *another type* of phone which *does*.


Well, I have used Tmobile for years, have a quad band phone from them
and they have a GSM system. I've used it here, in China, in Europe,
etc. All with no problem whatsoever. You just buy a local prepaid
SIM.


6. Americans don't quite grasp that SIMs can be put in *other* phones.

Having a multi-band phone, I went to buy a pre-paid SIM. No such
thing in the US! You can only buy a SIM *and* phone. Duh! I already
*have* a (compatible) phone, *three* of them!


Completely wrong. Just do a search for "pre-paid SIM in the US" and
see what you find.


Can you give a *specific* reference? As I said, I *did* search before
our trip and didn't find anything suitable. BTW, the guy at the Radio
Shack store where I eventually bought the SIM+phone didn't understand
what I meant when I said I wanted a SIM for my phone.


Here's one:
http://www.ustronics.com/USA_SIM_Car...FSAUagodlwubTQ


7. Americans don't grasp that mobile phones are actually ... ummm ...
*phones*.

When I wanted/needed to register the pre-paid AT&T GoPhone mobile
phone which I had to buy, AT&T insisted on having me use *another*
phone to perform the registration procedure. Duh! What about using
the bloody mobile phone itself, like is done in every other
country!?


You just found out why nobody uses ATT here. There are lots of other
you know.


Yes, but my prime concern is network-coverage. I've been bitten too
many times by non-coverage in rural areas or/and no-roaming onto other/
better networks, that I don't go for less-known brands anymore. Before
our trip I checked T-Mobile USA's (GSM) coverage in the areas where we
wanted to go, and it was worse than AT&T's. So I got a AT&T SIM(/phone).

For example in Australia it's Telstra for me, both mobile and 'fixed'
(pre-paid phone/calling card). I don't need to call that often/long, so
price/rates is of less concern, but *when* I need to call, I want to be
*able* to, and not be stuck with "A bloody useless mobile phone"
(courtesy John Williamson).


Well, if you're far enough out in the boonies, you won't get coverage
with anyone. That's the situation where I live in the mountains
outside of Denver. 10 minutes a day, I get a signal. No problem.


[...]

You were just running into New Jersey tourists. Most of us do know
how to drive. Except seniors who will signal a turn for about 10
miles.


Careful! You're *talking* to one of them there "seniors"!


And I'm one too!!


[...]

Hmmm. Must be why I load up on Swedish coffee everytime I go there.


*Don't* get me started on the Swedes!

But seriously (why?), I never heard of Swedish coffee. Probably have
to try it some time.


They have several very good brands, and they subsidize it in Sweden,
since the Swedes drink so much, making it nice and cheap as well. You
have Gevalia, Zoega and store brands among others.


N.B. Of course the Americans also do not have beer, but that fact is
so indisputable, I won't have to get into *that* one.


Not even close. We have tons of microbreweries that produce beers
that are every bit as good as any beer anywhere in the world. And
widely availble in any liquor store as well. Try a Sam Adams
sometime.


The beer-bashing thingie does the trick every time, doesn't it?


I rarely drink it myself, just straigthening out an old myth.


11. Americans don't realize that you don't *have* to 'deep' fry fish.

Why do they insist on deep frying perfectly good fish, even in
places which are directly on the coast, like Morro Bay and
(Fisherman's Warf in) San Francisco? If they don't *like* fish, then
why not just not order/eat it!? No sense in ruining it for others.


Should have gone to Chinatown where they know how to do fish fine.
They're Americans too you know.


We actually *did* go there, but for some strange reason we couldn't
read the signs. I wonder why!

But seriously, San Francisco's Chinatown is *huge*, isn't it? It went
on for blocks and blocks and blocks!


Yup, with great food all around. Next time, try the House of Nanking
for very good food and a crazed owner who will usually insist you
don't know anything about what you're ordering so he will order for
you. Just like a French maitre d'. You won't go wrong if he does.
Then, as I do, at the end of the meal ask him for a hot fudge sundae
and watch him go berserk. Works every time.


[...]

14. Americans actually stop for pedestrians.

This one also takes getting used to, but also is quite nice and
safe. Sometimes you're not even trying or wanting to cross the
street and you see stopped cars all around, patiently waiting for
you to make up your bloody mind.


That's because we don't want them denting our nice cars.


Great one! One to remember!

15. Americans are mostly nice, friendly people.

We mostly met and talked with nice, friendly people. That's of
course because we're so bloody nice ourselves.


We love foreigners. They're so cute!!


You can get us as pets, you know, and we're mostly house-trained.


That's what I tell my wife who is Swedish. She has no sense of humor.


OTOH, I couldn't find a toilet *anywhere*, and these people kept pointing
me to 'restroom's while I wasn't even tired! Stupid idiots! So after
getting home after two weeks, I had to have some *serious* leak (mostly
due to that beer####Bud of yours)!


The Dutch should talk. I have never seen so many different types of
toilets as I have in The Netherlands. You think you're turning on the
light and the toilet flushes.


[...]

To put things in perspective, they were even so nice to give us a
reference point in a staff-member from hell in a Best Western motel
somewhere. To set the tone, she was 'preceded' by two young,
clueless, incompetent and inaudible others. She managed to treat us
like dirt / non-existing for problems which the *motel* caused.


There are another kind?


(Ignoring the invisible smiley,) Yes, our experience was mostly
positive or at least neutral. If you treat them nice/friendly and with
respect, most people will return the favor, and that goes both ways
(service person -- customer).

[...]


Very true.
  #39  
Old December 13th, 2008, 02:54 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
John Kulp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,535
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.

On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 05:48:49 GMT, "Sharx35"
wrote:


If anyone has any doubts, we *loved* our trip and would do something
similar again in a flash, so you Seppos aren't all that bad!


Well, I have travelled in the U.S., too. After several dozen trips to the
U.S.,
**MY** bad experiences are a fraction of yours. I suspect it might be due to
your arrogant Eurocentric, obviously chip on the shoulder attitude to U.S.
culture. I am not a U.S. resident nor a U.S. citizen, however I much prefer
to travel in the U.S., compared
to the continent of Europe where the common attitude is that "WE are the
centre of the cultural universe
and the rest of the world are wannabes or boors". :Hell will freeze over
before I
travel to the continent of decay, Europe.


With your sense of humor, they will miss you like they do the bubonic
plague.
  #40  
Old December 13th, 2008, 02:54 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,rec.travel.australia+nz
sharx35
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 803
Default Report from the US, a nice but somewhat backward country.



"Frank Slootweg" wrote in message
b.home.nl...
[Re-added rec.travel.australia+nz because of the references to Oz (and I
don't believe in splitting up running discussions, unless there is a
very good reason). Of course anyone is free to think/act otherwise.]

Lawrence Akutagawa wrote:
[...]

Just for your edification - in California the sales tax (about 8.25%,
depending on where in the state) is already included in the quoted per
gallon price of gasoline. A number of years ago it was excluded from the
quoted price such that the tax was calculated subsequently as per all
other
taxable purchases. But no longer.


"tax", you pushed yet another one of my buttons (Perhaps that Sharx35
dude was right after all!?).

The tax thingie is rather confusing, needlessly complex, and, AFAICT,
has no advantages for the customer.

In most - but not all - cases, tax was excluded. As you say, the
percentage depends on the location and probably also on the type of
product/service. If you're buying one or a few products, it's hard to
impossible to give the shop attendant the exact amount or to (try to)
get as little change as possible back, until the cash register has
calculated how much you own. That is a nuisance, only takes addtional
time, and I see no advantage (*Is* there any advantage?).

In comparison, in Europe/Oz the sales price always includes the tax
(well, nearly always for Oz). In our country - The Netherlands - it's
even illegal to quote exclusive prices to 'consumers'. At minimal both
exclusive and inclusive have to be quoted, and even that is severely
frowned upon.

And it is always a good idea when driving an unfamiliar car for the first
time to check out all the controls - including the one releasing the gas
tank lid - before driving off. It is rather dicey to have to find the
windshield wiper control while going 70 mph in a sudden downpour at
night.


Yeah, I normally do that, at least when there's some light, which
there (much) wasn't for our first rental.

One time, after driving from SFO airport to somewhere in Silicon
Valley, I found myself in front of the motel, unable to get the key out
of the ignition. Had to push some unkown button, which European cars
didn't/don't have. Quite annoying and embarrasing after a light flight
from Europe.

I didn't check the gas tank lid, but I filled up early and we had the
nice lady in the mirror, hadn't we!?

Hope you had a good time and saw some things different than from where
you
are.


We had and did. If anything was even remotely 'familiar' it was Joshua
Tree NP, Mojave NP and Death Valley NP, and it was only somewhat similar
to the things we love in Australia, so we just had a cheaper - and sadly
enough much shorter - trip, than our 'normal' trips to/in Australia. Our
daughter asked "So the US is your new Australia?". Well it isn't, but
it's beautiful as well and comparisons are equally sillay as unfair.

I trust you were able to range as far north as Bodie and perhaps as
far east as Zion. You next go, try working in Bryce, Capitol Reef,
Arches,
Canyonlands, Dead Horse Point, Goblin Valley, Mesa Verde, Monument
Valley,
etc. You won't regret doing so.


(Without looking them up,) Most of the places you mention don't ring a
bell. To be clear, we visited only California (and a tiny bit (Pahrump)
of Nevada) and only a *part* of CA (see above).


If you don't like the way we do things in North America, STAY THE **** AWAY.
Many of us here
have NO PLANS to spend one bloody cent in ****ing Europe.



 




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