A Travel and vacations forum. TravelBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » TravelBanter forum » Travel Regions » Asia
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

IATA bids farewell to paper tickets



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 27th, 2007, 05:38 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
Alain Quai
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default IATA bids farewell to paper tickets

http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/27082007/325...r-tickets.html

GENEVA (Reuters) - The global airlines body IATA said on Monday it
had placed its last order for paper tickets, clearing the way for air
travel to be based entirely on electronic ticketing from June 1 next
year.

"In just 278 more days, the paper ticket will become a collector's
item," said Giovanni Bisignani, director general of the International
Air Transport Association.

The changeover from paper would not only cut airlines' costs by $9 for
every traveller but would also mean the industry -- criticised by
environmentalists for its part in global warming -- would save 50,000
mature trees a year, he added.

Bisignani did not say whether the $9 in cost savings would or should
be passed on to passengers.

Based in Geneva, IATA represents more than 240 airlines which operate
94 percent of scheduled international flights.

Non-IATA airlines, mainly low-cost carriers like the Irish Ryanair and
the British Easyjet, already have a paper-free ticket system where
travellers are registered in computers and present only an identity
document at check-in.

IATA launched its drive for so-called "e-ticketing" just over three
years ago and now 84 percent of travellers on IATA carriers fly
without paper tickets.

The airlines body says China, one of the fastest-growing markets for
air travel and host to next year's Olympic Games, is heading to be the
first country in the world to operate an entirely paper-free ticketing
system by the end of this year.

  #2  
Old August 27th, 2007, 07:56 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
Tom Peel[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 146
Default IATA bids farewell to paper tickets

Alain Quai schrieb:
http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/27082007/325...r-tickets.html

GENEVA (Reuters) - The global airlines body IATA said on Monday it
had placed its last order for paper tickets, clearing the way for air
travel to be based entirely on electronic ticketing from June 1 next
year.

"In just 278 more days, the paper ticket will become a collector's
item," said Giovanni Bisignani, director general of the International
Air Transport Association.

Does this mean the end of air travel for someone who doesn't have a
credit card and a PC?

T.
  #3  
Old August 27th, 2007, 08:02 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
Runge3
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 191
Default michaelnewport has plenty to post and nothing to say

could you bid ade once and for all ?

"Alain Quai" a écrit dans le message de
ups.com...
http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/27082007/325...r-tickets.html

GENEVA (Reuters) - The global airlines body IATA said on Monday it
had placed its last order for paper tickets, clearing the way for air
travel to be based entirely on electronic ticketing from June 1 next
year.

"In just 278 more days, the paper ticket will become a collector's
item," said Giovanni Bisignani, director general of the International
Air Transport Association.

The changeover from paper would not only cut airlines' costs by $9 for
every traveller but would also mean the industry -- criticised by
environmentalists for its part in global warming -- would save 50,000
mature trees a year, he added.

Bisignani did not say whether the $9 in cost savings would or should
be passed on to passengers.

Based in Geneva, IATA represents more than 240 airlines which operate
94 percent of scheduled international flights.

Non-IATA airlines, mainly low-cost carriers like the Irish Ryanair and
the British Easyjet, already have a paper-free ticket system where
travellers are registered in computers and present only an identity
document at check-in.

IATA launched its drive for so-called "e-ticketing" just over three
years ago and now 84 percent of travellers on IATA carriers fly
without paper tickets.

The airlines body says China, one of the fastest-growing markets for
air travel and host to next year's Olympic Games, is heading to be the
first country in the world to operate an entirely paper-free ticketing
system by the end of this year.


  #4  
Old August 27th, 2007, 08:58 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
AES
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 186
Default IATA bids farewell to paper tickets

In article ,
Tom Peel wrote:


"In just 278 more days, the paper ticket will become a collector's
item," said Giovanni Bisignani, director general of the International
Air Transport Association.

Does this mean the end of air travel for someone who doesn't have a
credit card and a PC?


Travel agent (to make bookings and print the bar code document) and
driver's license or passport (for ID at the airport) are likely to be an
acceptable alternative.
  #5  
Old August 27th, 2007, 10:13 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
VS[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 255
Default IATA bids farewell to paper tickets

In article . com,
Alain Quai wrote:

GENEVA (Reuters) - The global airlines body IATA said on Monday it
had placed its last order for paper tickets, clearing the way for air
travel to be based entirely on electronic ticketing from June 1 next
year.


My, and it seems like only yesterday our resident licensed attorney,
Paul Tauger, was advising us that an e-ticket is not a written
contract, and that the statute of frauds precludes enforcement
of non-written contracts. I wonder if they changed the statute of
frauds since then, or if IATA is in violation.

  #6  
Old August 27th, 2007, 10:41 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
Martin Sylvester
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default IATA bids farewell to paper tickets


"Magda" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:56:56 +0200, in rec.travel.europe, Tom Peel

arranged some electrons, so they looked like this:

... Alain Quai schrieb:
[...]
... Does this mean the end of air travel for someone who doesn't have a
... credit card and a PC?
[...]


You'll need a printer, too.


Might be wise, but not necessarily essential. I've travelled a few times
with a passport containing a post-it note bearing an e-ticket booking
reference copied from the PC screen.

Martin.

--
11(F) Group Ops room - the Battle of Britain Bunker
URL: http://www.sylvesternet.freeserve.co.uk/11gpops/
I do not intend to imply that any views expressed above represent the policy
of any organisation, nor do I warrant any information to be accurate.


  #7  
Old August 27th, 2007, 10:52 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 175
Default IATA bids farewell to paper tickets

On Aug 27, 5:13 pm, (VS) wrote:
In article . com,
Alain Quai wrote:

GENEVA (Reuters) - The global airlines body IATA said on Monday it
had placed its last order for paper tickets, clearing the way for air
travel to be based entirely on electronic ticketing from June 1 next
year.


My, and it seems like only yesterday our resident licensed attorney,
Paul Tauger, was advising us that an e-ticket is not a written
contract, and that the statute of frauds precludes enforcement
of non-written contracts.



E-tickets are written contracts. And even if they weren't, the
statute of frauds only precludes the enforcement of certain non-
written contracts, not all of them. IIRC a non-written contract for
services is still enforceable under the statute of frauds unless it is
impossible to perform the services in one year - so a non-written
contract for an airline flight would be enforceable under the statute
of frauds.

  #8  
Old August 27th, 2007, 11:37 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
VS[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 255
Default IATA bids farewell to paper tickets

In article . com,
wrote:

E-tickets are written contracts.


Is that right? Paul Tauger, our resident lawyer, spake onto us ignorant
laymen on many occasions that in his learned, licensed-attorney opinion,
an e-ticket is not a written contract, e.g.:
http://tinyurl.com/3xov8k

Are you suggesting that Paul Tauger, Esq., who is - as he never tires
of reminding all and sundry - a licensed attorney, is actually wrong
on a matter of law?!

  #9  
Old August 28th, 2007, 02:23 AM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
Brian[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,152
Default IATA bids farewell to paper tickets

On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 22:41:25 +0100, "Martin Sylvester"
wrote:


Might be wise, but not necessarily essential. I've travelled a few times
with a passport containing a post-it note bearing an e-ticket booking
reference copied from the PC screen.

Martin.


There have been a number of times when I've printed it out and then
someone at the airport has ignored it and reprinted it.

  #10  
Old August 28th, 2007, 03:42 AM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
Don Wiss
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 176
Default IATA bids farewell to paper tickets

On Tue, 28 Aug 2007 01:47:44 GMT, Craig Welch wrote:

It's just a few years ago that I last had a ticket (international) that
was not only printed, but *hand written*.


I had one that was hand written just a couple months ago. This as I showed
up for my Malaysia Airlines international flight forgetting I had a paper
ticket and they made me buy another ticket, which they hand wrote. They
still haven't refunded my double payment and I'm having to dispute it with
my credit card company.

Don www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
IATA bids farewell to paper tickets Alain Quai Air travel 72 September 18th, 2007 02:23 AM
Paper tickets.. [email protected] Air travel 3 December 30th, 2006 11:29 AM
are paper tickets necessary? ccc Cruises 4 December 4th, 2005 05:51 AM
When are paper tickets necessary for US-Europe airfares? Traveler Europe 12 February 12th, 2004 02:15 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 TravelBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.