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London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens



 
 
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  #51  
Old April 14th, 2013, 04:09 AM posted to rec.travel.europe
Mark Brader
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Posts: 346
Default London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

Dan Stephenson:
Oops, I got the gain-day versus loss-day swapped.


Just remember, the sun moves from east to west, so (clock) time moves
more slowly when you follow it. (And the International Date Line works
the other way, because its job is to cancel the whole day's worth of
time zone shifts you accumulate in a complete circumnavigation.)
--
Mark Brader | "Any philosophy that can be put 'in a nutshell'
Toronto | belongs there."
| --Sydney J. Harris
  #52  
Old April 14th, 2013, 10:48 AM posted to rec.travel.europe
Mark Brader
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Posts: 346
Default London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

Dan Stephenson:
On second thought, I'm afraid the Alps and Venice are just too much to
fit into the time available, especially since March is the timeframe
and the passes will be closed to some extent.


March? You're planning a super-rushed trip *almost a year ahead*?
Or does your calendar run the wrong way too? :-)

By the way, I hope you get the calendar-date thing right when it comes
to making reservations based on which day you arrive in Europe.
--
Mark Brader | "... you're a detective, you like mysteries."
Toronto | "I hate mysteries. What I like are *solutions*."
| --Barbara Paul, "The Apostrophe Thief"

My text in this article is in the public domain.
  #53  
Old April 14th, 2013, 09:59 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Erilar
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Posts: 599
Default Norway is Beautiful London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

Dan Stephenson wrote:
On 2013-04-04 12:32:39 -0500, tim...... said:

"Dan Stephenson" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
From my recollection travelling through that area before, it's ALL
beautimous. So I would ask if there are any glaciers that one can
drive to and walk someone close to the face? That would definitely
shape my route. Any ideas?
Not aware of any worthwhile glacier faces on mainland Europe (even in Norway).
You have to go to the far north islands (Iceland/Greenland/Svalbard) for that
tim


That depends on your definition of "worthwhile".

Norway is the most beautiful places I've driven, the whole length of it
is. It's a tour a person should take once in their lives. And the
Lofoten penninsula in particular... it's Land Of The Lost.


I can't handle a lot of walking nowadays, so I'm traveling by ship-- going
south on the Hurtigruten this time, with a Lofoten excursion. It'snice
taking the hotel and restaurant along! 8-). I took the northbound trip a
few years ago, between Viking ship museums in Copenhagen(well, Roskilde)
and Oslo. Gorgeous country!

--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist with iPad
  #54  
Old April 17th, 2013, 01:37 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Dan Stephenson
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Posts: 591
Default British Isles are perfect for scenic driving London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

On 2013-04-14 04:48:48 -0500, Mark Brader said:

Dan Stephenson:
On second thought, I'm afraid the Alps and Venice are just too much to
fit into the time available, especially since March is the timeframe
and the passes will be closed to some extent.


March? You're planning a super-rushed trip *almost a year ahead*?
Or does your calendar run the wrong way too? :-)

By the way, I hope you get the calendar-date thing right when it comes
to making reservations based on which day you arrive in Europe.


ha yes I plan well in advance so there are no last minutes rushes or surprises

In this way, the actual trip is laid back and carefree

I lay in anchor points such as arrival and departure, and budget
roughly for sightseeing, so when I am in-country, the travel is
somewhat spontaneous. This was especially true of my travels in the
British Isles. Quite literally, I would plan a day's approximate route
over breakfast. How cool is that? I incredibly loved travelling the
backroads between obscure megalithics.

Even the single lane roads were an adventure... "gee how do we get out
of this one"... when facing another vehicle, remembering where the last
"wide spot" was.

Travelling in the Fall, reaching out of the car window to pick huge
blackberry off the verge. And getting to use words like "verge".

Being completely lost in all ways, and stumbling on a pub in the middle
of danged nowhere, and having a pint of something with a cool looking
logo

Being bemused as the sheep try to be intimidating when visiting some
old ruin or megalithic, a few following you shoulder-to-shoulder as if
to put up a front

Discovering all the ways stiles are made to allow people to cross but
not the sheep

Keeping an eye out for cows, which are not so intimidated as sheep :-)

That wonderful overcast, breezy, cool and drizzling weather (my home is
in Texas, which is typically the reverse of all that)

The lush grass, the ancient history, the locals you can mostly
understand, fish and chips, and television that is either bizarre or
fascinating


--
Dan Stephenson
http://stepheda.com
Travel pages for Europe and the U.S.A. (and New Zealand too)

  #55  
Old April 17th, 2013, 02:29 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Tim C.[_5_]
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Posts: 920
Default British Isles are perfect for scenic driving London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 14:55:58 +0200, Martin wrote in post :
:

Best not used in France.
It's not for nothing that "Beware Soft Verges" signs are no longer
used in UK.


I'm still amazed that, considering the huge number of German speakers in
the USA, that they still ask for a Latte when in a coffee house.

--
Tim C. Linz, Austria.
  #56  
Old April 17th, 2013, 02:39 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
David Horne[_2_]
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Posts: 890
Default British Isles are perfect for scenic driving London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

Tim C. wrote:

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 14:55:58 +0200, Martin wrote in post :
:

Best not used in France.
It's not for nothing that "Beware Soft Verges" signs are no longer
used in UK.


I'm still amazed that, considering the huge number of German speakers in
the USA, that they still ask for a Latte when in a coffee house.


Don't think it's huge, despite the ancestry. Wiki claims 1.38 million.

D

--
(*) of the royal duchy of city south and deansgate
www.davidhorne.net (email address on website)
"[Do you think the world learned anything from the first
world war?] No. They never learn." -Harry Patch (1898-2009)
  #57  
Old April 17th, 2013, 02:58 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
David Horne[_2_]
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Posts: 890
Default British Isles are perfect for scenic driving London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

Martin wrote:

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 14:39:01 +0100, (David Horne)
wrote:

Tim C. wrote:

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 14:55:58 +0200, Martin wrote in post :
:

Best not used in France.
It's not for nothing that "Beware Soft Verges" signs are no longer
used in UK.

I'm still amazed that, considering the huge number of German speakers in
the USA, that they still ask for a Latte when in a coffee house.


Don't think it's huge, despite the ancestry. Wiki claims 1.38 million.


I looked it up, because just judging from the number of Americans with
German surnames it seems far too low.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_American
"German Americans (German: Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the
United States who were either born in Germany or are of German
ancestry. They comprise about 50 million people,[1] making them the
largest ancestry group ahead of Irish Americans, African Americans and
English Americans.[5] They comprise about 1/3 of the German diaspora
all over the world.[6][7][8]"


But http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_..._United_States
gives a pretty good rationale as to why it would be that low. It
wouldn't surprise me, based on the number of Americans I know who don't
speak a word or the German, despite the ancestry.

D

--
(*) of the royal duchy of city south and deansgate
www.davidhorne.net (email address on website)
"[Do you think the world learned anything from the first
world war?] No. They never learn." -Harry Patch (1898-2009)
  #58  
Old April 17th, 2013, 03:09 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
David Horne[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 890
Default British Isles are perfect for scenic driving London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

Martin wrote:

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 14:58:29 +0100, (David Horne)
wrote:

Martin wrote:

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 14:39:01 +0100,
(David Horne)
wrote:

Tim C. wrote:

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 14:55:58 +0200, Martin wrote in post :
:

Best not used in France.
It's not for nothing that "Beware Soft Verges" signs are no longer
used in UK.

I'm still amazed that, considering the huge number of German speakers in
the USA, that they still ask for a Latte when in a coffee house.

Don't think it's huge, despite the ancestry. Wiki claims 1.38 million.

I looked it up, because just judging from the number of Americans with
German surnames it seems far too low.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_American
"German Americans (German: Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the
United States who were either born in Germany or are of German
ancestry. They comprise about 50 million people,[1] making them the
largest ancestry group ahead of Irish Americans, African Americans and
English Americans.[5] They comprise about 1/3 of the German diaspora
all over the world.[6][7][8]"


But http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_..._United_States
gives a pretty good rationale as to why it would be that low. It
wouldn't surprise me, based on the number of Americans I know who don't
speak a word or the German, despite the ancestry.


Duh! German speakers! I am amazed that it is as high as 1.38 million.

My mistake.


Ah- yes 1.38 of German ancestry would be impossible small!

D

--
(*) of the royal duchy of city south and deansgate
www.davidhorne.net (email address on website)
"[Do you think the world learned anything from the first
world war?] No. They never learn." -Harry Patch (1898-2009)
  #59  
Old April 17th, 2013, 03:15 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Tim C.[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 920
Default British Isles are perfect for scenic driving London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 15:43:33 +0200, Martin wrote in post :
:

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 15:29:42 +0200, "Tim C."
wrote:

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 14:55:58 +0200, Martin wrote in post :
:

Best not used in France.
It's not for nothing that "Beware Soft Verges" signs are no longer
used in UK.


I'm still amazed that, considering the huge number of German speakers in
the USA, that they still ask for a Latte when in a coffee house.


Google translates it as "lath"


Literally plank. Colloquially "stiffy".

--
Tim C. Linz, Austria.
  #60  
Old April 17th, 2013, 04:06 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
James Silverton[_3_]
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Posts: 212
Default British Isles are perfect for scenic driving London-Paris-Alps-Venice-Athens

On 4/17/2013 9:39 AM, David Horne wrote:
Tim C. wrote:

On Wed, 17 Apr 2013 14:55:58 +0200, Martin wrote in post :
:

Best not used in France.
It's not for nothing that "Beware Soft Verges" signs are no longer
used in UK.


I'm still amazed that, considering the huge number of German speakers in
the USA, that they still ask for a Latte when in a coffee house.


Don't think it's huge, despite the ancestry. Wiki claims 1.38 million.

D

Lots of Americans have many claims to ancestry without the ability to
speak the appropriate language. My kids have German, French, Russian,
English, Irish, Welsh and Scottish ancestry; sort of real Americans I
would say :-) Their linguistic abilities exceed most Americans by
having some ability in French. My daughter spent two years working for a
German bank in Frankfurt and my son's *Spanish* is respectable.

--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
 




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