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  #21  
Old May 30th, 2008, 09:08 PM posted to rec.travel.asia
Markku Grönroos
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Posts: 2,095
Default India maps


"grusl" kirjoitti
.. .


Anyways ... Eicher publishes a perfectly good national road map of India,
regional road maps, and also do street directories of the five major
cities. Widely available in bookstores.

I guess the OP declined the street directories as useless. In which scale
this national road map comes? Knowing that the geographic size of India is
around 3.3 million square kilometres, the street atlas supposedly comes with
at least ten thousand sheets. Otherwise it can be described as "perfect" but
hardly as "detailed". Digital maps come to rescue. What about google m.....?

  #22  
Old May 30th, 2008, 09:45 PM posted to rec.travel.asia
Markku Grönroos
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Posts: 2,095
Default India maps


"Bob Myers" kirjoitti
...


I carry a GPS with me everywhere I go (any one of
several, but most often a Garmin GPSMap 76). Simply

I have that piece too. I don't use it for car navigation any more but
otherwise it will do just fine. It has a long battery life which I
appreciate a lot.

  #23  
Old May 30th, 2008, 10:05 PM posted to rec.travel.asia
Bob Myers
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Posts: 204
Default India maps


"Markku Grönroos" wrote in message
i...

"Bob Myers" kirjoitti
...


I carry a GPS with me everywhere I go (any one of
several, but most often a Garmin GPSMap 76). Simply

I have that piece too. I don't use it for car navigation any more but
otherwise it will do just fine. It has a long battery life which I
appreciate a lot.


Yes - it's a bit bulky by current standards (I've also
got a PDA which includes a GPS, but I haven't found
a utility for it yet that will do a decent job of duplicating
the GPSMap's functions), but on the other hand that
also means a decent-sized screen and usable controls.

If someone doesn't think a GPS (maps or no maps) can
come in handy when traveling, well, you're not using
the thing right...

Bob M.


  #24  
Old May 30th, 2008, 10:29 PM posted to rec.travel.asia
William Black
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,125
Default India maps


"Markku Grönroos" wrote in message
i...

I demonstrated in the earlier text (which is most sane indeed) a device
which tells the direction (and effectively distance) to any destination.
Because directions are relative to a destination rather than some
universal object - shall we say the North - they are very easy to read on
the maps which don't support routing. When the direction is 90 degrees
("east", east is east only when you are going to north) in clockwise
unless one wants to introduce negative directions which means that the
destination is where the straight line points to - on your right.
Similarly when the straight line (between you and the destination) points
to left it means - yes, the destination is right there. Whenever the
declination is whether less than 90 degrees or more than 270 degrees, you
are approaching the target. Otherwise you drawing away.


Ever driven in an Indian city?

Well.

Reading that obviously not...

Not that it's something I ever want to do again...

--
William Black


I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.



  #25  
Old May 30th, 2008, 10:30 PM posted to rec.travel.asia
William Black
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,125
Default India maps


"grusl" wrote in message
...


Anyways ... Eicher publishes a perfectly good national road map of India,
regional road maps, and also do street directories of the five major
cities. Widely available in bookstores.


I've seem them recently, they're now available in the UK.

Have you used them at all?

--
William Black


I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.




  #26  
Old May 30th, 2008, 11:02 PM posted to rec.travel.asia
Markku Grönroos
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,095
Default India maps


"William Black" kirjoitti
.. .

"Markku Grönroos" wrote in message
i...

I demonstrated in the earlier text (which is most sane indeed) a device
which tells the direction (and effectively distance) to any destination.
Because directions are relative to a destination rather than some
universal object - shall we say the North - they are very easy to read on
the maps which don't support routing. When the direction is 90 degrees
("east", east is east only when you are going to north) in clockwise
unless one wants to introduce negative directions which means that the
destination is where the straight line points to - on your right.
Similarly when the straight line (between you and the destination) points
to left it means - yes, the destination is right there. Whenever the
declination is whether less than 90 degrees or more than 270 degrees, you
are approaching the target. Otherwise you drawing away.


Ever driven in an Indian city?

I have never visited India.

Well.

Reading that obviously not...

Not that it's something I ever want to do again...

My reference doesn't take into account of driving. Tourists seldom drive
cars in India. For all good reason so. The explanation covers situations in
which tourists build and maintain their own routing to destinations. In self
driven cars it is difficult (few drive anyways). In taxis drivers typically
know the way. And when they don't know, they cannot read maps anyways. Buses
take you where ever on fixed routes (passengers make a decision only about
at which bus stop they'll get out).

So, by far the most typical example about a tourist who controls his way
(like Frankie boy) is Fjodor who plies the streets of Jaipur on foot. Just
beware of cow manure.

Last summer I leased a car for almost a week in Egypt. I had a garmin
plotter which supports routing. Unfortunately Navteq who supplies maps to
Garmin doesn't cover Egypt by it's detailed maps but one very small scale
general map and it does not support routing. In Sinai it didn't matter much
because the road network is so scarce and hence obvious. In the Delta region
it was all different. Dense network of roads and directions given only in
Arabic. One day I left from Ismalya town along the Suez Canal to Alexandria.
I had a plan to drive via Zagazig and Tanta (a bit more than 300
kilometres). Well, just before Zagazig I choose a wrong turn and ended up to
a village off track. In Zagazig I missed the right turn to left (Northwest
to Tanta) but continued to north. By reading my plotter I soon realized that
I was on the Al-Mansura road instead of the planned Tanta road. So, I took a
wrong road but I wasn't lost, thank's to the plotter. I decided to drive all
the way to Al-Mansura and from there to Tanta and Alex. I left Ismalya in
early morning and I reached the city limits of Alex around 16:00. Pretty
slow but very illuminating a journey....

  #27  
Old May 30th, 2008, 11:17 PM posted to rec.travel.asia
LarbGai
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 222
Default India maps

On May 31, 10:02*am, Markku Grönroos wrote:
"William Black" kirjoitti
.. .





"Markku Grönroos" wrote in message
. fi...


I demonstrated in the earlier text (which is most sane indeed) a device
which tells the direction (and effectively distance) to any destination..
Because directions are relative to a destination rather than some
universal object - shall we say the North - they are very easy to read on
the maps which don't support routing. When the direction is 90 degrees
("east", east is east only when you are going to north) in clockwise
unless one wants to introduce negative directions which means that the
destination is where the straight line points to - on your right.
Similarly when the straight line (between you and the destination) points
to left it means - yes, the destination is right there. Whenever the
declination is whether less than 90 degrees or more than 270 degrees, you
are approaching the target. Otherwise you drawing away.


Ever driven in an Indian city?


I have never visited India.

Well.


Reading that obviously not...


Not that it's something I ever want to do again...


My reference doesn't take into account of driving. Tourists seldom drive
cars in India. For all good reason so. The explanation covers situations in
which tourists build and maintain their own routing to destinations. In self
driven cars it is difficult (few drive anyways). In taxis drivers typically
know the way. And when they don't know, they cannot read maps anyways. Buses
take you where ever on fixed routes (passengers make a decision only about
at which bus stop they'll get out).

So, by far the most typical example about a tourist who controls his way
(like Frankie boy) is Fjodor who plies the streets of Jaipur on foot. Just
beware of cow manure.

Last summer I leased a car for almost a week in Egypt. I had a garmin
plotter which supports routing. Unfortunately Navteq who supplies maps to
Garmin doesn't cover Egypt by it's detailed maps but one very small scale
general map and it does not support routing. In Sinai it didn't matter much
because the road network is so scarce and hence obvious. In the Delta region
it was all different. Dense network of roads and directions given only in
Arabic. One day I left from Ismalya town along the Suez Canal to Alexandria.
I had a plan to drive via Zagazig and Tanta (a bit more than 300
kilometres). Well, just before Zagazig I choose a wrong turn and ended up to
a village off track. In Zagazig I missed the right turn to left (Northwest
to Tanta) but continued to north. By reading my plotter I soon realized that
I was on the Al-Mansura road instead of the planned Tanta road. So, I took a
wrong road but I wasn't lost, thank's to the plotter. I decided to drive all
the way to Al-Mansura and from there to Tanta and Alex. I left Ismalya in
early morning and I reached the city limits of Alex around 16:00. Pretty
slow but very illuminating a journey....- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -



******* Hey Goonyroos!!!! Do they allow racists like you into
India????
  #28  
Old May 30th, 2008, 11:26 PM posted to rec.travel.asia
William Black
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,125
Default India maps


"Markku Grönroos" wrote in message
i...


So, by far the most typical example about a tourist who controls his way
(like Frankie boy) is Fjodor who plies the streets of Jaipur on foot. Just
beware of cow manure.


???

Why?

I mean, out in the sticks, yes. But the old milk herds disapeared from
the Indian cities years ago and while you will see a cow or two outside the
big temples their attendants clean up after them.


Last summer I leased a car for almost a week in Egypt. I had a garmin
plotter which supports routing. Unfortunately Navteq who supplies maps to
Garmin doesn't cover Egypt by it's detailed maps but one very small scale
general map and it does not support routing. In Sinai it didn't matter
much because the road network is so scarce and hence obvious. In the Delta
region it was all different. Dense network of roads and directions given
only in Arabic. One day I left from Ismalya town along the Suez Canal to
Alexandria. I had a plan to drive via Zagazig and Tanta (a bit more than
300 kilometres). Well, just before Zagazig I choose a wrong turn and ended
up to a village off track. In Zagazig I missed the right turn to left
(Northwest to Tanta) but continued to north. By reading my plotter I soon
realized that I was on the Al-Mansura road instead of the planned Tanta
road. So, I took a wrong road but I wasn't lost, thank's to the plotter. I
decided to drive all the way to Al-Mansura and from there to Tanta and
Alex. I left Ismalya in early morning and I reached the city limits of
Alex around 16:00. Pretty slow but very illuminating a journey....


Take it from me, the last thing anyone worries about in India is a lack of
roads.

A lack of signs, or a lack of surface, yes...

But there's no lack of roads...

--
William Black


I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.



  #29  
Old May 31st, 2008, 12:47 AM posted to rec.travel.asia
Alan S[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,163
Default India maps

On Fri, 30 May 2008 16:24:40 +0100, "William Black"
wrote:


My solution is to hire a car with a driver when we get somewhere. The
driver you hire will usually know their way around the place.


And is far less likely to hit something, or be hit by
something, than a foreigner in a rental car.

I've driven in many countries, but I have neither the nerve
nor the death wish to drive in India:-)


Cheers, Alan, Australia
--
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alan_s/
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com
Latest: Bangkok Grand Palace
  #30  
Old May 31st, 2008, 01:15 AM posted to rec.travel.asia
Srki
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default India maps

Srki wrote:
I am looking for sam booklet map of india so it can be used page by
page, any recomendations? It's also good if it has samo tourist place
briefings but not necessery.
any amazon recomendations?

Thanx
S.


It's lika an afternoon gossip when i just wanted a sugestion. How do i
use google earth in india anyway, looking for a cyber bar every time i
need it. Some camera, objectives and a laptop i enough, i just wanted
some paper format map for a rough guide.
 




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