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Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane



 
 
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  #21  
Old June 17th, 2010, 10:10 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
Dudley Henriques
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Posts: 48
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

On Jun 17, 2:44*pm, Mxsmanic wrote:
GrtArtiste writes:
Given this set of circumstances, what types of assistance would a
commercial-rated pilot be able to offer assuming she is not rated on
this type aircraft? I would guess-communications with ATC primarily.
What else?


The same things any non-pilot could do: move levers and buttons when the
captain asks her two, read checklists, communicate with ATC, etc. *It helps a
bit if she has piloting experience, but that doesn't mean that she will be
doing anything that _requires_ piloting experience.


This is absolutely correct. At no time was this attendant actually
flying this aircraft. She came up front and sat down in the right seat
acting as an extra set of hands to select, push, pull, and turn, any
and all switches and levers as asked for by the Captain. She acted as
an "assistant" and that's all.
Not to take anything away from this lady who performed as asked to
perform under trying circumstances, and indeed she personally appeared
on national TV this morning to "set straight" all the hype being
presented about her acting in any other capacity than that I have
stated above.
It helped certainly that this nice lady had flying experience but it
was by NO MEANS essential to what she was asked to do or what she
actually did in the cockpit.
Had the Captain opted to, he most certainly could have completed the
flight to a safe completion from the left seat without assistance. He
might have had to extend his reach a bit at times, but nothing earth
shattering for sure.
All in all, this was a class crew and they did a class job, right down
to the stew who very classily and politely deflated the media hype on
her role in the completion of this flight.
Dudley Henriques
  #22  
Old June 17th, 2010, 10:26 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
Hatunen
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Posts: 4,483
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

On Thu, 17 Jun 2010 20:41:58 +0200, Mxsmanic
wrote:

Floyd ""Ralph\"@ ralphs.com" writes:

I hope the attendant gets a chance to fly for American as a pilot.


Without valid and current pilot's certifications, her chances are zero. And
she's past 60 years old, so she probably wouldn't be a good investment as a
pilot at this point in time.


Perhaps not for an ATR rating, but it was already mentioned that
she has a commrcial pilot's license.

--
************* DAVE HATUNEN ) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
  #23  
Old June 18th, 2010, 05:13 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
Wingnut[_2_]
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Posts: 37
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

On Thu, 17 Jun 2010 14:10:01 -0700, Dudley Henriques wrote:

It helped certainly that this nice lady had flying experience but it
was by NO MEANS essential to what she was asked to do or what she
actually did in the cockpit.

Had the Captain opted to, he most certainly could have completed the
flight to a safe completion from the left seat without assistance. He
might have had to extend his reach a bit at times, but nothing earth
shattering for sure.

All in all, this was a class crew and they did a class job, right down
to the stew who very classily and politely deflated the media hype on
her role in the completion of this flight.


Consider who would have been landing the plane if something had caused
the pilot to also conk out, though. Then her prior flight experience
would have become quite relevant indeed.
  #24  
Old June 18th, 2010, 01:45 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
Dudley Henriques
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Posts: 48
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

On Jun 18, 12:13*am, Wingnut wrote:
On Thu, 17 Jun 2010 14:10:01 -0700, Dudley Henriques wrote:
It helped certainly that this nice lady had flying experience but it
was by NO MEANS essential to what she was asked to do or what she
actually did in the cockpit.


Had the Captain opted to, he most certainly could have completed the
flight to a safe completion from the left seat without assistance. He
might have had to extend his reach a bit at times, but nothing earth
shattering for sure.


All in all, this was a class crew and they did a class job, right down
to the stew who very classily and politely deflated the media hype on
her role in the completion of this flight.


Consider who would have been landing the plane if something had caused
the pilot to also conk out, though. Then her prior flight experience
would have become quite relevant indeed.


It's an interesting hypothesis for sure, and such a scenario has
indeed been the subject of many discussions over time. The general
consensus in the area where I work in human factors in aircraft
accidents is that the result of such an attempt would depend on many
factors, a great many of these factors over and above the "experience"
factor of the newbie involved.
Makes a great movie though :-))
DH
  #25  
Old June 18th, 2010, 06:51 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
Mxsmanic
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Posts: 5,830
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

Wingnut writes:

Consider who would have been landing the plane if something had caused
the pilot to also conk out, though. Then her prior flight experience
would have become quite relevant indeed.


Not necessarily. In a situation like that, what would be most important would
be her ability to follow instructions precisely, and the availability of a
qualified pilot to guide her over the radio. These two things would override
any piloting experience she might have.

There are two myths that need to be dispelled, namely (1) the notion that
anyone with any piloting experience necessarily will do a better job of
getting an plane home safely in an emergency, and (2) the notion that someone
without any piloting experience would necessarily crash the airplane.

The skill needed when both pilots get sick from the fish is an ability to do
as one is told, and this is independent of piloting experience. Additionally,
a qualified pilot needs to be available on the radio (preferably an
instructor). An experienced Cessna pilot without help over the radio will
probably get in some possibly fatal trouble, and conversely a non-pilot with
expert help over the radio may well be able to land the airplane safely.

This has a great deal to do with automation and the differences between
airliners and small aircraft.

You would definitely want to avoid someone who might be tempted to take
initiatives rather than just follow instructions--and for this reason, putting
a Cessna pilot in the left seat might actually be a worse idea than putting a
complete non-pilot in that seat. The non-pilot might be more likely to just do
as he is told, which is exactly what you need.
  #26  
Old June 18th, 2010, 07:17 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
Bob Myers
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Posts: 204
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

Mxsmanic wrote:


There are two myths that need to be dispelled, namely (1) the notion
that anyone with any piloting experience necessarily will do a better
job of getting an plane home safely in an emergency, and (2) the
notion that someone without any piloting experience would necessarily
crash the airplane.


Your personal experience re piloting is...what, exactly?


Bob M.


  #27  
Old June 18th, 2010, 09:34 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
george[_2_]
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Posts: 31
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

On Jun 19, 6:17*am, "Bob Myers" wrote:
Mxsmanic wrote:

There are two myths that need to be dispelled, namely (1) the notion
that anyone with any piloting experience necessarily will do a better
job of getting an plane home safely in an emergency, and (2) the
notion that someone without any piloting experience would necessarily
crash the airplane.


Your personal experience re piloting is...what, exactly?

He's our own little Walter Mitty...
No doubt this incidence infringes on one of his dreams

  #28  
Old June 19th, 2010, 12:11 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
Dudley Henriques
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Posts: 48
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

On Jun 18, 12:13*am, Wingnut wrote:
On Thu, 17 Jun 2010 14:10:01 -0700, Dudley Henriques wrote:
It helped certainly that this nice lady had flying experience but it
was by NO MEANS essential to what she was asked to do or what she
actually did in the cockpit.


Had the Captain opted to, he most certainly could have completed the
flight to a safe completion from the left seat without assistance. He
might have had to extend his reach a bit at times, but nothing earth
shattering for sure.


All in all, this was a class crew and they did a class job, right down
to the stew who very classily and politely deflated the media hype on
her role in the completion of this flight.


Consider who would have been landing the plane if something had caused
the pilot to also conk out, though. Then her prior flight experience
would have become quite relevant indeed.


Actually her prior light plane flying experience could be a negative
believe it or not. Her ability to follow explicit instruction
resulting in any control input involves an aircraft time
line requiring a response to input correction involving an input to
initiate and an input to stop the response. Assuming a requirement for
a correct result each and every time a control input was initiated,
prior experience in a light plane enters the element of expectation
into the input equation for the newbie. In other words, the difference
between the actual result of any manual control input to a 767's
controls in any and all axis, especially when coupled, roll/
yaw.......pitch/roll etc.....by a newbie needing the result to be
right the first time tried from verbal instruction with the newbie
having an expected response based on a totally different airplane
places an EXTRA element into the equation that could easily extend/
alter/ or change the required response time line.
This scenario could easily make the correction time line longer than
it might have been had no expectation of aircraft response been
involved.
All this is just a fancy way of saying that prior experience in a
Cessna 150 might not matter in a 767 being landed by a newbie
following detailed instruction.
DH
  #29  
Old June 19th, 2010, 01:02 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
[email protected]
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Posts: 17
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

On Jun 18, 12:51*pm, Mxsmanic wrote:

Not necessarily. In a situation like that, what would be most important would
be her ability to follow instructions precisely, and the availability of a
qualified pilot to guide her over the radio. These two things would override
any piloting experience she might have.


WRONG
  #30  
Old June 19th, 2010, 11:40 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.arts.tv,alt.gossip.celebrities
Ari Silverstein
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Posts: 377
Default Co-pilot gets sick, stewardess helps land airplane

On Fri, 18 Jun 2010 16:11:10 -0700 (PDT), Dudley Henriques wrote:

All this is just a fancy way of saying that prior experience in a
Cessna 150 might not matter in a 767 being landed by a newbie
following detailed instruction.


Like Atta? Tell Dekker and Hilliard that.

lol
--
A fireside chat not with Ari!
http://tr.im/holj
Motto: Live To Spooge It!
 




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