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  #1  
Old January 3rd, 2008, 03:16 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada
[email protected]
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Posts: 1
Default insunrace

these days people do not buy insurances for a day trip or even longer
trip. I have seen many people saying that is just a insurance, but
still that is why people do need insurance for just in case. Why
people coming to Canada (not just only Americans, but other people)
stoped to buy insurance?? If you need some, there are so many
packeages you can purchase without waiting time. http:www/biis/ca
  #2  
Old January 3rd, 2008, 07:01 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada
Calif Bill
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Posts: 991
Default insunrace


wrote in message
...
these days people do not buy insurances for a day trip or even longer
trip. I have seen many people saying that is just a insurance, but
still that is why people do need insurance for just in case. Why
people coming to Canada (not just only Americans, but other people)
stoped to buy insurance?? If you need some, there are so many
packeages you can purchase without waiting time. http:www/biis/ca


Because most of us that have insurance are covered in Canada. And we would
buy from somebody who could actually spell if we need to purchase insurance.
Might mean their brain works and had not been affected by SPAM.


  #6  
Old January 3rd, 2008, 10:56 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada
Lawrence Akutagawa
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Posts: 462
Default insunrace


"MI" wrote in message
...

On 1/2/08 10:19 PM, in article ,
"Hatunen" wrote:

On Wed, 2 Jan 2008 18:16:42 -0800 (PST),

wrote:

these days people do not buy insurances for a day trip or even longer
trip. I have seen many people saying that is just a insurance, but
still that is why people do need insurance for just in case. Why
people coming to Canada (not just only Americans, but other people)
stoped to buy insurance?? If you need some, there are so many
packeages you can purchase without waiting time. http:www/biis/ca


Canadians sure do talk funny.


Ever consider English as a second language? He probably speaks French. We
are a bilingual country you know.


Now that brings up an interesting point. I've made a number of trips to
Canada, the early ones to Bristish Columbia and Alberta. Strolling along
the grocery shelves, I was amused to find that each and every labeled item
had both English and French descriptions/writings. Clearly, thought I, the
influence of the French in Canada...even though I heard no French
spoken...truly the mark of a bilingual country.

Then I some years later happened to visit Quebec province and took a
similar stroll in the groceries there. Lo and behold - the same items
labeled in both English and French in the wesern provinces were labeled only
in French! So - what gives? A dual standard?


  #7  
Old January 4th, 2008, 12:23 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada
MI
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Posts: 106
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On 1/3/08 1:56 PM, in article ,
"Lawrence Akutagawa" wrote:


"MI" wrote in message
...

On 1/2/08 10:19 PM, in article ,
"Hatunen" wrote:

On Wed, 2 Jan 2008 18:16:42 -0800 (PST),

wrote:

these days people do not buy insurances for a day trip or even longer
trip. I have seen many people saying that is just a insurance, but
still that is why people do need insurance for just in case. Why
people coming to Canada (not just only Americans, but other people)
stoped to buy insurance?? If you need some, there are so many
packeages you can purchase without waiting time. http:www/biis/ca

Canadians sure do talk funny.


Ever consider English as a second language? He probably speaks French. We
are a bilingual country you know.


Now that brings up an interesting point. I've made a number of trips to
Canada, the early ones to Bristish Columbia and Alberta. Strolling along
the grocery shelves, I was amused to find that each and every labeled item
had both English and French descriptions/writings. Clearly, thought I, the
influence of the French in Canada...even though I heard no French
spoken...truly the mark of a bilingual country.

Then I some years later happened to visit Quebec province and took a
similar stroll in the groceries there. Lo and behold - the same items
labeled in both English and French in the wesern provinces were labeled only
in French! So - what gives? A dual standard?


You got that right. I live in British Columbia and Federal law says
groceries must be bilingual. Companies are supposed to have a bilingual
employee and all government offices do. But we do have a double standard.
One language rule for Quebec and another for the rest of us. Actually Quebec
is supposed to do it too, but they won't and the Fed's don't want to upset
them in case they go on another secession kick.

--
Martha Canada


  #8  
Old January 4th, 2008, 06:28 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada
sharx35
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Posts: 803
Default insunrace


"Lawrence Akutagawa" wrote in message
...

"MI" wrote in message
...

On 1/2/08 10:19 PM, in article
,
"Hatunen" wrote:

On Wed, 2 Jan 2008 18:16:42 -0800 (PST),

wrote:

these days people do not buy insurances for a day trip or even longer
trip. I have seen many people saying that is just a insurance, but
still that is why people do need insurance for just in case. Why
people coming to Canada (not just only Americans, but other people)
stoped to buy insurance?? If you need some, there are so many
packeages you can purchase without waiting time. http:www/biis/ca

Canadians sure do talk funny.


Ever consider English as a second language? He probably speaks French. We
are a bilingual country you know.


Now that brings up an interesting point. I've made a number of trips to
Canada, the early ones to Bristish Columbia and Alberta. Strolling along
the grocery shelves, I was amused to find that each and every labeled item
had both English and French descriptions/writings. Clearly, thought I,
the influence of the French in Canada...even though I heard no French
spoken...truly the mark of a bilingual country.

Then I some years later happened to visit Quebec province and took a
similar stroll in the groceries there. Lo and behold - the same items
labeled in both English and French in the wesern provinces were labeled
only in French! So - what gives? A dual standard?


No, just hypocrisy. The ****ing idiots in the Quebec government get all
whacked out over English, but have no trouble at all decreeing French
only;....all over the place, The SOONER, that Quebec GETS THE **** out of MY
CANADA, the better.



  #9  
Old January 4th, 2008, 11:14 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada
TheNewsGuy(Mike)
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Posts: 319
Default insunrace

Lawrence Akutagawa wrote:
... I've made a number of trips to
Canada, the early ones to Bristish Columbia and Alberta. Strolling along
the grocery shelves, I was amused to find that each and every labeled item
had both English and French descriptions/writings.



Come to Markham Ontario some time. Almost every plaza, store sign,
business etc. is in Chinese with no French or English - just Chinese.
Everywhere, on everything. Not politically correct to demand it. Try
shopping at the pacific Mall or or the TnT Supermarkets. LOL!! Where
are our "bilingual" laws there? - ... (just in case you're wondering I
don't care - I just find it interesting)



--
===========================
Sawyer Nicknames
http://sawyer.xtreemhost.com/

Seinfeld Trivia, Lists, and Scripts
http://seinfeld.xtreemhost.com/
===========================
  #10  
Old January 4th, 2008, 05:06 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada
Lawrence Akutagawa
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 462
Default insunrace


"TheNewsGuy(Mike)" wrote in message
...
Lawrence Akutagawa wrote:
... I've made a number of trips to
Canada, the early ones to Bristish Columbia and Alberta. Strolling along
the grocery shelves, I was amused to find that each and every labeled
item had both English and French descriptions/writings.



Come to Markham Ontario some time. Almost every plaza, store sign,
business etc. is in Chinese with no French or English - just Chinese.
Everywhere, on everything. Not politically correct to demand it. Try
shopping at the pacific Mall or or the TnT Supermarkets. LOL!! Where
are our "bilingual" laws there? - ... (just in case you're wondering I
don't care - I just find it interesting)


Signage I expect and am not the least bit surprised. It's labeling on
everyday items - like canned goods, ceral boxes, etc. - distributed nation
wide that surprised me. Now if you are saying that items that...on the one
hand in British Columbia and Alberta bear English and French labels and on
the other hand in Quebec bear only French labels...in Markham Ontario bear
only Chinese labels, then - yes - I would be surprised. So pray tell, are
there any such items and - if so - what are some specific examples?


 




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