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A report from Andalucia, July 2017



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 10th, 2017, 03:54 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,talk.politics.european-union
Simon Laub[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default A report from Andalucia, July 2017

Have just returned from a trip to Andalucia.
Lots of impressions to pass on, but, sadly, not much activity
in rec.travel.european these days? I.e. not that many
to pass the story on to?
Nevertheless, I'll give it a go:

Shortly: Andalucia has certainly been influenced
by a lot of people over the centuries.
From roman emperors, onwards to muslim caliphates,
followed by Viking raids (Vikings who later settle in the
area, selling cheese) and forward to Spanish kings,
who started expeditions to the rest of the world from
the Andalician heartland.
Between all the wars you certainly don't get the impression
that the past was such a glorious time of stability
that you sometimes see it portrayed as in the media ...

But, well, the land is still there.
And well worth a visit.

You can see some pictures from my trip he
http://www.simonlaub.net/Fortunecity...017/index.html

best wishes
-Simon


  #2  
Old July 10th, 2017, 08:46 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,talk.politics.european-union
poldy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 787
Default A report from Andalucia, July 2017

On 7/10/17 7:54 AM, Simon Laub wrote:
Have just returned from a trip to Andalucia.
Lots of impressions to pass on, but, sadly, not much activity
in rec.travel.european these days? I.e. not that many
to pass the story on to?
Nevertheless, I'll give it a go:

Shortly: Andalucia has certainly been influenced
by a lot of people over the centuries.
From roman emperors, onwards to muslim caliphates,
followed by Viking raids (Vikings who later settle in the
area, selling cheese) and forward to Spanish kings,
who started expeditions to the rest of the world from
the Andalician heartland.
Between all the wars you certainly don't get the impression
that the past was such a glorious time of stability
that you sometimes see it portrayed as in the media ...

But, well, the land is still there.
And well worth a visit.

You can see some pictures from my trip he
http://www.simonlaub.net/Fortunecity...017/index.html

best wishes
-Simon



When I think of Andalucia, I remember the story about the Puerto del
Suspiro del Moro, the way the sultan left Granada after being kicked out.

Then of course there's the Ponte dei Sospiri in Venice.

Different kind of sigh but interesting that two different places evoked
similar responses.

--
Serenity Now!
  #3  
Old July 10th, 2017, 09:27 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,talk.politics.european-union
Ken Blake[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default A report from Andalucia, July 2017

On Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:46:56 -0700, poldy wrote:

When I think of Andalucia, I remember the story about the Puerto del
Suspiro del Moro, the way the sultan left Granada after being kicked out.

Then of course there's the Ponte dei Sospiri in Venice.

Different kind of sigh but interesting that two different places evoked
similar responses.



A pretty similar kind of sigh. The Ponte dei Sospiri is a bridge
connecting the Palazzo Dogale with the prison cells. It's not called
the "bridge of sighs" because of any sighs of people sighing when
looking at it from the outside.It has a small window in it, and
prisoners were said to sigh as they crossed the bridge, looked out the
window, and saw their last glimpse of daylight before being locked up.
  #4  
Old July 11th, 2017, 09:32 AM posted to rec.travel.europe
Surreyman[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 303
Default A report from Andalucia, July 2017

On Monday, July 10, 2017 at 9:27:50 PM UTC+1, Ken Blake wrote:
On Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:46:56 -0700, poldy wrote:

When I think of Andalucia, I remember the story about the Puerto del
Suspiro del Moro, the way the sultan left Granada after being kicked out.

Then of course there's the Ponte dei Sospiri in Venice.

Different kind of sigh but interesting that two different places evoked
similar responses.



A pretty similar kind of sigh. The Ponte dei Sospiri is a bridge
connecting the Palazzo Dogale with the prison cells. It's not called
the "bridge of sighs" because of any sighs of people sighing when
looking at it from the outside.It has a small window in it, and
prisoners were said to sigh as they crossed the bridge, looked out the
window, and saw their last glimpse of daylight before being locked up.


"Vikings who later settle in the area, selling cheese"?
Well, that really enhances our historical knowledge of the del Sol.
I agree, though, that sadly this group has largely lapsed.
We've just returned from a fascinating first amble around Sicily, but I doubt if anyone is interested .............. ?
  #5  
Old July 11th, 2017, 10:42 AM posted to rec.travel.europe
tim...[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 45
Default A report from Andalucia, July 2017



"Surreyman" wrote in message
...
On Monday, July 10, 2017 at 9:27:50 PM UTC+1, Ken Blake wrote:
On Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:46:56 -0700, poldy wrote:

When I think of Andalucia, I remember the story about the Puerto del
Suspiro del Moro, the way the sultan left Granada after being kicked
out.

Then of course there's the Ponte dei Sospiri in Venice.

Different kind of sigh but interesting that two different places evoked
similar responses.



A pretty similar kind of sigh. The Ponte dei Sospiri is a bridge
connecting the Palazzo Dogale with the prison cells. It's not called
the "bridge of sighs" because of any sighs of people sighing when
looking at it from the outside.It has a small window in it, and
prisoners were said to sigh as they crossed the bridge, looked out the
window, and saw their last glimpse of daylight before being locked up.


"Vikings who later settle in the area, selling cheese"?
Well, that really enhances our historical knowledge of the del Sol.
I agree, though, that sadly this group has largely lapsed.
We've just returned from a fascinating first amble around Sicily, but I
doubt if anyone is interested .............. ?


yes please :-)

tim



  #6  
Old July 11th, 2017, 08:35 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
tim...[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 45
Default A report from Andalucia, July 2017



"Martin" wrote in message
news
On Tue, 11 Jul 2017 10:42:36 +0100, "tim..."
wrote:



"Surreyman" wrote in message
...
On Monday, July 10, 2017 at 9:27:50 PM UTC+1, Ken Blake wrote:
On Mon, 10 Jul 2017 12:46:56 -0700, poldy wrote:

When I think of Andalucia, I remember the story about the Puerto del
Suspiro del Moro, the way the sultan left Granada after being kicked
out.

Then of course there's the Ponte dei Sospiri in Venice.

Different kind of sigh but interesting that two different places
evoked
similar responses.


A pretty similar kind of sigh. The Ponte dei Sospiri is a bridge
connecting the Palazzo Dogale with the prison cells. It's not called
the "bridge of sighs" because of any sighs of people sighing when
looking at it from the outside.It has a small window in it, and
prisoners were said to sigh as they crossed the bridge, looked out the
window, and saw their last glimpse of daylight before being locked up.

"Vikings who later settle in the area, selling cheese"?
Well, that really enhances our historical knowledge of the del Sol.
I agree, though, that sadly this group has largely lapsed.
We've just returned from a fascinating first amble around Sicily, but I
doubt if anyone is interested .............. ?


yes please :-)


Me too!


to be clear that I'm not just asking in order to keep the group alive ...

I first (and only) visited Sicily in 82 when I was working a year in Italy

This was pre internet, without a guide book, flying by the seat of my pants
stuff

I knew a few places that I had to go to: Mt Etna, Agrigento, Palermo etc

I scheduled a two week holiday which I spent in the very south of Italy and
on the Island - travelling by train. It was November BTW, glorious weather
all week, though it did **** down the previous week when I had been in
Naples :-(

I'm sure that I missed some places. I remember that I got the train to
Enna, fully expecting that if the station wasn't in the town centre (it
isn't by about 5 km) there would be as bus as the had been at *every* other
random Italian town that I had visited. But there wasn't and still isn't
(actually I found a web site that says that there us, but there are no bus
stops on street view!) - and there isn't even a sign of a taxi rank, though
no doubt there's now a phone number on the wall that you can ring with your
mobile - something that I, of course, didn't have in 82.

Now, with 35 years of traveling experience behind me, I think I should go
back and fill in the gaps.

I'm minded to hire a car, but I am concerned by the overly cheap prices that
are charged and whether it is possible to avoid all the scams that you read
of to bump up the costs when you get there.

Or I can again go by train (and bus) though this time using the internet to
plan properly.

Or I could see if I can add on some organised day trips from hotels in the
mains towns - I don't rate that option much, but sometimes it works.

or there is this:

http://www.secretitalia.it/tours/sic...lendours-tour/

but plus flights (and therefore no obligation on the tour company to help
you if the flights are late/cancelled) the price is just silly

So am generally interested in how you travelled around and any out of the
ordinary places that you visited.

tim



  #7  
Old July 16th, 2017, 07:07 AM posted to rec.travel.europe,talk.politics.european-union
Paul Aubrin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default A report from Andalucia, July 2017

On Mon, 10 Jul 2017 16:54:45 +0200, Simon Laub wrote:

Have just returned from a trip to Andalucia.
Lots of impressions to pass on, but, sadly, not much activity in
rec.travel.european these days? I.e. not that many to pass the story on
to?
Nevertheless, I'll give it a go:

Shortly: Andalucia has certainly been influenced by a lot of people over
the centuries.
From roman emperors, onwards to muslim caliphates,
followed by Viking raids (Vikings who later settle in the area, selling
cheese) and forward to Spanish kings,
who started expeditions to the rest of the world from the Andalician
heartland.
Between all the wars you certainly don't get the impression that the
past was such a glorious time of stability that you sometimes see it
portrayed as in the media ...

But, well, the land is still there.
And well worth a visit.

You can see some pictures from my trip he
http://www.simonlaub.net/Fortunecity...017/index.html

best wishes -Simon


Andaluces de Jaen
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unVF1tAALUk
Miguel Hernandez 1937
Paco Ibanez.

Another version.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNpXVzCwvjs

Andaluces de Jaén,
aceituneros altivos,
decidme en el alma: ¿quién,
quién levantó los olivos?

No los levantó la nada,
ni el dinero, ni el señor,
sino la tierra callada,
el trabajo y el sudor.

Unidos al agua pura
y a los planetas unidos,
los tres dieron la hermosura
de los troncos retorcidos.

Levántate, olivo cano,
dijeron al pie del viento.
Y el olivo alzó una mano
poderosa de cimiento.

Andaluces de Jaén,
aceituneros altivos,
decidme en el alma: ¿quién
amamantó los olivos?

Vuestra sangre, vuestra vida,
no la del explotador
que se enriqueció en la herida
generosa del sudor.

No la del terrateniente
que os sepultó en la pobreza,
que os pisoteó la frente,
que os redujo la cabeza.

Árboles que vuestro afán
consagró al centro del d*a
eran principio de un pan
que sólo el otro com*a.

¡Cuántos siglos de aceituna,
los pies y las manos presos,
sol a sol y luna a luna,
pesan sobre vuestros huesos!

Andaluces de Jaén,
aceituneros altivos,
pregunta mi alma: ¿de quién,
de quién son estos olivos?

Jaén, levántate brava
sobre tus piedras lunares,
no vayas a ser esclava
con todos tus olivares.

Dentro de la claridad
del aceite y sus aromas,
indican tu libertad
la libertad de tus lomas.
 




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