A Travel and vacations forum. TravelBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » TravelBanter forum » Travel Regions » USA & Canada
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old July 19th, 2006, 03:33 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
Mike Tantillo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?


Dave Smith wrote:
Hatunen wrote:



I believe getting current tags usually involves paying
registration fees for the years tags weren't obtained, which in
some states and for some cars can amount to a fair piece of
money.


Sometimes it also involves safety certification or emissions testing. In
most states and provinces it would also require payment of outstanding
fines.

Anyone thinking about driving around with switched plates or expired plates
should be aware of the technology available to police officers and their on
board computers. The enforcement agency I worked for was not exactly at
the cutting edge of technology, but I could punch in a licence plate from
any Canadian province and US state and in 2-3 seconds it would display a
vehicle description and identify the owner. If it was a plate from this
province it would automatically display the owner's driver licence number
and was flagged if he was under suspension or currently unlicensed. For
commercial vehicles, the company's safety violation rate was immediately
displayed. There were all sorts of hyper linked fields to access driver
conviction records etc.


I assume you'd still have to do something to get the cop's attention in
order to prompt them to punch in the number. Unless they're literally
bringing up license plate info as they drive around "just for the fun
of it"...

A few years ago people could get away with playing dumb sometimes, but
these days it is not worth it.


  #26  
Old July 19th, 2006, 05:34 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
John Gaquin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

wrote in message

I want to know 4 things:

I'm going to be driving from Washington, DC to northern Louisiana with
an LA license plate that expired a couple of years ago.


1. Why?

Insurance and driver's license are okay.


2. Who underwrites insurance on an unregistered car on public roads with
illegal plates?

3. Are you a troll?

4. If you're "bright enough" to think up this plan, how do you think you'll
be able to find your way to Louisiana?




  #27  
Old July 19th, 2006, 06:25 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
Carole Allen[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 485
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 13:09:34 -0700, Hatunen wrote:
I believe getting current tags usually involves paying
registration fees for the years tags weren't obtained, which in
some states and for some cars can amount to a fair piece of
money.

Only fair, as those fees help to maintain the roads the deadbeat with
the expired plates has been using.
  #28  
Old July 19th, 2006, 07:41 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
Doug Smith W9WI
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 65
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

Mike Tantillo wrote:
I assume you'd still have to do something to get the cop's attention in
order to prompt them to punch in the number. Unless they're literally
bringing up license plate info as they drive around "just for the fun
of it"...


Doesn't Louisiana use renewal stickers? (I thought all 50 states did?)

Around here, (Tennessee) when you first get your plate they put a
sticker on it, showing what month it expires - it might say "JUL" in
large letters. You get another sticker that might say "2006", showing
that it expires at the end of July, 2006. When you renew, you get a
sticker that says "2007", you stick it over the top of "2006" to show
the plate is valid for another year. The procedure is identical in
Wisconsin.

An officer doesn't have to get very close to be able to read both
stickers, and if he does he knows the plate is (or isn't) expired. He
doesn't have to run it through the computer to know.

--
Doug Smith W9WI
Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66
http://www.w9wi.com

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
rec.travel.europe FAQ Yves Bellefeuille Europe 0 February 18th, 2006 05:27 AM
rec.travel.europe FAQ Yves Bellefeuille Travel - anything else not covered 0 February 18th, 2006 05:27 AM
Updated version of FAQ Yves Bellefeuille Europe 8 December 13th, 2005 06:24 AM
rec.travel.europe FAQ Yves Bellefeuille Europe 9 November 11th, 2003 09:05 AM
rec.travel.europe FAQ Yves Bellefeuille Europe 0 October 10th, 2003 09:44 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 TravelBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.