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Bilingual in Europe versus USA



 
 
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  #362  
Old September 7th, 2006, 09:40 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.usa-canada
Padraig Breathnach
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Posts: 1,358
Default sedation, was Bilingual in Europe versus USA

Dave Frightens Me wrote:

On Thu, 07 Sep 2006 14:55:35 +0100, Padraig Breathnach
wrote:

There is, however, a tendency in America to create verbs. It even has
its own verb: verb.


I think that also happens in British English. There was no pure
English even before the USA!

It happens far more in America.

It irks me when people invent a new verb when there is already a
perfectly serviceable one already in use.

It also irks me when it rains when I plan some outdoor activity.

I know; I know. I can't stop either happening, and I just get on with
life. But I am allowed feel grouchy, am I not?

--
PB
The return address has been MUNGED
My travel writing: http://www.iol.ie/~draoi/
  #365  
Old September 8th, 2006, 02:30 AM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.usa-canada
Karen Selwyn
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Posts: 139
Default sedation, was Bilingual in Europe versus USA

Dave Frightens Me wrote:


Do you really use the word "sedation" in this context to indicate the
action of settling down ? I may be biased by the fact we in Italian
would use the word "insediamento" which would indicate both the action
of settling down, and a settlement as a place.



No. As someone mother-tongue English who also speaks Italian, I can
assure you that sedation only means medically drugged.


I know I've heard the word "sedation" used in archaeology in a way that
doesn't mean medically drugged.

Yup. From a Google search, it appears that the word refers to a dating
procedure or, at least, an ordering procedure. If you ignore the Google
links that obviously refer to the medical meaning and carefully screen
out links to sites that by coincidence include both the word
"archaeology" and "sedation" you'll still come up with enough links to
persuade naysayers that "sedation" has a meaning besides the medical one.

Here's a fragment from one Google link: "The main use of sedation in
archaeology is to determine temporal order." (I can't access the full
article in the journal AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST at Anthrosource.net.)

Here's another from the ANNUAL REVIEW OF ARCHAEOLOGY: "Dating Methods
9503... Sedation in archaeology..."

Happily, I did turn up one reasonably accessible link. The abstract of
the article "The Unitary Association Method of Relative Dating and Its
Application to Archaeological Data" that appears the in JOURNAL OF
ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD AND THEORY includes the following: "The Unitary
Association Method of Relative Dating is an alternative to seriation
methods that is less susceptible to spatial variation and offers
analytical strengths needed for regional chronological analyses." The
abstract doesn't include the word "sedation;" that word apparently is in
the complete article, but the Google link inludes the following from the
complete article, "Like all archaeological methods, UAM is not a
stand-alone procedure. There are times when sedation will be the best
way to determine the order..."

An abstract from the MIDCONTINENTAL JOURNAL OF ARCHAEOLOGY actually
includes the word "sedation": "Temporal variation in the morphology and
decoration of late Middle Archaic (ca. 6000-5000 B.P.) bone pins from
the middle Mississippi and lower Ohio River valleys is explored. A
preliminary chronology of pin morphology and decoration is proposed
based on sedation, radiocarbon dates, stratigraphy, associations between
engraved decoration and head morphology, and similarities in head shape
and cross section. Square-top pins appear to be the earliest forms,
occurring prior to 5500 B.P."

Karen Selwyn



I'm picking up a a link via Google in the

  #366  
Old September 8th, 2006, 11:52 AM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.usa-canada
Dave Frightens Me
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Posts: 2,777
Default sedation, was Bilingual in Europe versus USA

On Thu, 07 Sep 2006 21:40:55 +0100, Padraig Breathnach
wrote:

Dave Frightens Me wrote:

On Thu, 07 Sep 2006 14:55:35 +0100, Padraig Breathnach
wrote:

There is, however, a tendency in America to create verbs. It even has
its own verb: verb.


I think that also happens in British English. There was no pure
English even before the USA!

It happens far more in America.

It irks me when people invent a new verb when there is already a
perfectly serviceable one already in use.

It also irks me when it rains when I plan some outdoor activity.

I know; I know. I can't stop either happening, and I just get on with
life. But I am allowed feel grouchy, am I not?


Are irk and grouch both proper English? )
--
---
DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
---
--
  #367  
Old September 8th, 2006, 11:55 AM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.usa-canada
Dave Frightens Me
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,777
Default sedation, was Bilingual in Europe versus USA

On Thu, 07 Sep 2006 21:30:14 -0400, Karen Selwyn
wrote:

Dave Frightens Me wrote:


Do you really use the word "sedation" in this context to indicate the
action of settling down ? I may be biased by the fact we in Italian
would use the word "insediamento" which would indicate both the action
of settling down, and a settlement as a place.



No. As someone mother-tongue English who also speaks Italian, I can
assure you that sedation only means medically drugged.


I know I've heard the word "sedation" used in archaeology in a way that
doesn't mean medically drugged.


A very specific piece of terminology in an area I'm unfamiliar with.
Apparently I was wrong.

I'm picking up a a link via Google in the


....?

Please, don't keep us in suspense!
--
---
DFM - http://www.deepfriedmars.com
---
--
  #368  
Old September 8th, 2006, 12:43 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.usa-canada
Karen Selwyn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default sedation, was Bilingual in Europe versus USA

Dave Frightens Me wrote:

I'm picking up a a link via Google in the



...?

Please, don't keep us in suspense!


Whoops! An artifact of poor editing last night!

Karen Selwyn

  #369  
Old September 8th, 2006, 02:48 PM posted to rec.travel.europe,rec.travel.usa-canada
but I'm the only gay in the village of Llanddewi Brefi
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Posts: 89
Default sedation, was Bilingual in Europe versus USA


Dave Frightens Me wrote:
On Thu, 07 Sep 2006 14:55:35 +0100, Padraig Breathnach
wrote:

Giovanni Drogo wrote:

On Thu, 7 Sep 2006, wrote:

Basically I have read that there is evidence that "sedation"
(building of permanent settlements and the infrastructure that goes
along with it)

Do you really use the word "sedation" in this context to indicate the
action of settling down ? I may be biased by the fact we in Italian
would use the word "insediamento" which would indicate both the action
of settling down, and a settlement as a place.

In my language the word "sedazione" means only the action to make
something or somebody quiet, calm, typically in a medical context (I've
even seen a posting "pedosedazione" in a dentistry institute to
indicate the department to give anaesthetic to children), and I've heard
the same in English (my mother had gastroscopy under sedation
["gastroscopia sotto sedazione'] in Scotland).


I checked with NSOED, and it does not recognise the use of "sedation"
or "sedate" to refer in any way to the creation of settlements.

There is, however, a tendency in America to create verbs. It even has
its own verb: verb.


I think that also happens in British English. There was no pure
English even before the USA!
--


it was Dutch

 




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