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Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?



 
 
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  #11  
Old July 18th, 2006, 08:48 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
[email protected][_1_]
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Posts: 68
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

I used to live next door to a cop. He told me once that tags that are
seriously out of date raise a giant red flag to any cop who sees them.

Call your local Bureau of Motor Vehicles and they'll tell you how to
get up-to-date tags. Driving with tags that old isn't worth the risk.

  #12  
Old July 18th, 2006, 09:09 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
Hatunen
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Posts: 4,483
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

On 18 Jul 2006 12:48:06 -0700, "
wrote:

I used to live next door to a cop. He told me once that tags that are
seriously out of date raise a giant red flag to any cop who sees them.

Call your local Bureau of Motor Vehicles and they'll tell you how to
get up-to-date tags. Driving with tags that old isn't worth the risk.


I believe getting current tags usually involves paying
registration fees for the years tags weren't obtained, which in
some states and for some cars can amount to a fair piece of
money.

************* DAVE HATUNEN ) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
  #13  
Old July 18th, 2006, 10:20 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
Dave Smith
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Posts: 654
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

" wrote:

I used to live next door to a cop. He told me once that tags that are
seriously out of date raise a giant red flag to any cop who sees them.

Call your local Bureau of Motor Vehicles and they'll tell you how to
get up-to-date tags. Driving with tags that old isn't worth the risk.


Of course they are red flags. A seriously expired plate usually means the
owner doesn't give a damn, so there are probably lots of other things. I
used to find the typical scenario was expired plates, safety problems, no
insurance and unlicensed or suspended driver.

  #14  
Old July 18th, 2006, 10:27 PM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
Dave Smith
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Posts: 654
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

Hatunen wrote:



I believe getting current tags usually involves paying
registration fees for the years tags weren't obtained, which in
some states and for some cars can amount to a fair piece of
money.


Sometimes it also involves safety certification or emissions testing. In
most states and provinces it would also require payment of outstanding
fines.

Anyone thinking about driving around with switched plates or expired plates
should be aware of the technology available to police officers and their on
board computers. The enforcement agency I worked for was not exactly at
the cutting edge of technology, but I could punch in a licence plate from
any Canadian province and US state and in 2-3 seconds it would display a
vehicle description and identify the owner. If it was a plate from this
province it would automatically display the owner's driver licence number
and was flagged if he was under suspension or currently unlicensed. For
commercial vehicles, the company's safety violation rate was immediately
displayed. There were all sorts of hyper linked fields to access driver
conviction records etc.

A few years ago people could get away with playing dumb sometimes, but
these days it is not worth it.

  #16  
Old July 19th, 2006, 12:35 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
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Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?


wrote:
I'm going to be driving from Washington, DC to northern Louisiana with
an LA license plate that expired a couple of years ago. Insurance and
driver's license are okay. Any suggestions about what route I should
take or how I can avoid getting pulled over? I'm a pretty safe driver,
don't speed...going to try and make sure my car is clean and not
conspicuous...

Should I just stick to major interstates and hope a cop doesn't get
close enough to notice? What about smaller, more remote highways and
local roads? (Travel time is not a concern...)

Does anyone have suggestions about specific states, cities, or roads I
should avoid? I've heard plenty about cops in the south being worse
about hassling drivers from out of state. I've heard bad things about
Lousiana police on I-10, too, and although I won't have to drive very
far into LA, I'm concerned about getting nabbed there, where the police
will certainly know what color my tag is supposed to be.

Has anyone else done this? Any suggestions would be very helpful!


Here's another point of view - chances are, the cops won't notice.

It depends on what state you're coming from. It's doubtful the cops
have every state's tags memorized. It actually shouldn't be that hard.
Consider New Jersey - they stopped providing registration stickers in
2004. Many people are driving around with tags that appear to have
expired in 2004, but in reality they are completely legal.

So hey, go for it.

  #17  
Old July 19th, 2006, 12:45 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
sechumlib
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Posts: 987
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

On 2006-07-18 19:35:18 -0400, " said:

Here's another point of view - chances are, the cops won't notice.

It depends on what state you're coming from. It's doubtful the cops
have every state's tags memorized. It actually shouldn't be that hard.
Consider New Jersey - they stopped providing registration stickers in
2004. Many people are driving around with tags that appear to have
expired in 2004, but in reality they are completely legal.

So hey, go for it.


Right! Always encourage lawbreaking.

  #19  
Old July 19th, 2006, 03:06 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
Alohacyberian
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Posts: 748
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

wrote in message
ups.com...
wrote:
I'm going to be driving from Washington, DC to northern Louisiana with
an LA license plate that expired a couple of years ago. Insurance and
driver's license are okay. Any suggestions about what route I should
take or how I can avoid getting pulled over? I'm a pretty safe driver,
don't speed...going to try and make sure my car is clean and not
conspicuous...

Should I just stick to major interstates and hope a cop doesn't get
close enough to notice? What about smaller, more remote highways and
local roads? (Travel time is not a concern...)

Does anyone have suggestions about specific states, cities, or roads I
should avoid? I've heard plenty about cops in the south being worse
about hassling drivers from out of state. I've heard bad things about
Lousiana police on I-10, too, and although I won't have to drive very
far into LA, I'm concerned about getting nabbed there, where the police
will certainly know what color my tag is supposed to be.

Has anyone else done this? Any suggestions would be very helpful!


Here's another point of view - chances are, the cops won't notice.

It depends on what state you're coming from. It's doubtful the cops
have every state's tags memorized. It actually shouldn't be that hard.
Consider New Jersey - they stopped providing registration stickers in
2004. Many people are driving around with tags that appear to have
expired in 2004, but in reality they are completely legal.

So hey, go for it.

You're absolutely right, most police officers don't care about expired
plates if they're from another state. However, most states have what is
called a "permit to transport", which you can get from the local DMV. They
are most commonly used for people who buy a car in, say, Colorado and want
to have it licensed and registered in their home state when they get there,
so they get a "permit to transport". I was planning to buy a new car about
10-12 days after my old plates expired. So rather than pay for a whole year
on the old car, I decided to walk to work or take the bus until I was ready
to buy. I became very keyed to license plates and discovered after only a
few trips to work that he heck of a lot of cars have expired tabs. I
happened to run into a police officer and asked him about that and he said,
"No we see that as the DMV's problem and we won't pull anyone over for
expired tags, but, if we pull them over for something else, we'll ticket
them for expired tags". So, it's probably different in different
jurisdictions. Just this year, I noticed that my tabs were expired and
realized that I'd neglected to put them on the car after I got them. I'd
been driving around for months with expired tags and was never pulled over.
KM
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(-:alohacyberian:-) At my website there are 3600 live cameras or
visit NASA, the Vatican, the Smithsonian, the Louvre, CIA, FBI or
CNN, NBA, the White House, Academy Awards & 150 foreign languages
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  #20  
Old July 19th, 2006, 03:33 AM posted to rec.travel.usa-canada,misc.transport.road
GK
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Posts: 6
Default Driving cross country with expired tags - how to avoid police?

wrote:
I'm going to be driving from Washington, DC to northern Louisiana with
an LA license plate that expired a couple of years ago. Insurance and
driver's license are okay. Any suggestions about what route I should
take or how I can avoid getting pulled over? I'm a pretty safe driver,
don't speed...going to try and make sure my car is clean and not
conspicuous...

Should I just stick to major interstates and hope a cop doesn't get
close enough to notice? What about smaller, more remote highways and
local roads? (Travel time is not a concern...)

Does anyone have suggestions about specific states, cities, or roads I
should avoid? I've heard plenty about cops in the south being worse
about hassling drivers from out of state. I've heard bad things about
Lousiana police on I-10, too, and although I won't have to drive very
far into LA, I'm concerned about getting nabbed there, where the police
will certainly know what color my tag is supposed to be.

Has anyone else done this? Any suggestions would be very helpful!

The answer: It all depends.

When I was a kid in college and needed to drive a car from one state to
another, I took a cardboard shoebox lid and a magic marker and made up
my own state and license plate with a FRACTION on the end, even drove
through NYC and no one bothered me.

Chances are you might get stopped and impounded and towed and get hit
with no car and a lot of bills to pay that only get higher due to
storage fees. Then they won't release it until you register it anyway.

Try to get a temp tag as others suggested.

Here's a valid question:
Used to be some states didn't legally care where you lived and would
issue a legal registration by mail even, along with plates, just as long
as you paid the fee. Wondering if any states still do that.

GK
 




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