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Tokyo with a Very Young Child



 
 
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  #31  
Old September 19th, 2003, 08:29 AM
Gerry Scott-Moore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Tokyo with a Very Young Child

In article , PTRAVEL
wrote:

I think you need to find somebody to beat up on that is talking
about the same thing.


If I've confused you with the OP, my apologies.


Actually I think I have too with another post upstream.

And in any case the seminal few posts were at cross-purposes. My view
is that bookending seats with a spouse is just fine. If someone
actually gets plunked down in between, one or other can shift over as
the needs demand. This is unrelated to infants.

The idea of a ceaselessly shuffled infant between two seats, on either
side OR in the same 3-seat row both sounds like a nightmare
prescription. But then there are many such situations you could never
guess about.

While everybody finally managed to go to sleep on my last flight to
Japan, there was a Thai couple, very much country folk, that were were
screaming at each other, very shrill, every 15-20 minutes or so. Waking
me repeatedly. Apparently I was the only one that could hear it and
they were two rows back and across the aisle. I even asked a
stewardess to shut them up, and she gave them the one-size-fits-all
request and then evaporated.

There's one I couldn't have guessed. Noice cancelling head-sets are
beginning to look interesting.

--
///---
  #32  
Old September 19th, 2003, 01:53 PM
PTRAVEL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Tokyo with a Very Young Child


"Gerry Scott-Moore" wrote in message
d...
In article , PTRAVEL
wrote:

I think you need to find somebody to beat up on that is talking
about the same thing.


If I've confused you with the OP, my apologies.


Actually I think I have too with another post upstream.

And in any case the seminal few posts were at cross-purposes. My view
is that bookending seats with a spouse is just fine. If someone
actually gets plunked down in between, one or other can shift over as
the needs demand. This is unrelated to infants.


I don't have any problem at all with bookending spouses -- I've done the
same thing on occassion, and it's always worked out. Worst that happened
was one of us would switch seats with the bookended stranger and all were
happy.


The idea of a ceaselessly shuffled infant between two seats, on either
side OR in the same 3-seat row both sounds like a nightmare
prescription. But then there are many such situations you could never
guess about.


It happened to me once on Cathay Pacific. I objected, long and loud, and
told them I would not sit in a row that had more people than seats.
Apparently, they found that argument convincing enough -- Cathay's solution
was an upgrade to business class once we took off.


While everybody finally managed to go to sleep on my last flight to
Japan, there was a Thai couple, very much country folk, that were were
screaming at each other, very shrill, every 15-20 minutes or so. Waking
me repeatedly. Apparently I was the only one that could hear it and
they were two rows back and across the aisle. I even asked a
stewardess to shut them up, and she gave them the one-size-fits-all
request and then evaporated.

There's one I couldn't have guessed. Noice cancelling head-sets are
beginning to look interesting.


I'm on my third pair of noise cancellers. The problem with NC phones is
that, though they were very well on repetitive, low-frequency noise, e.g.
the roar of the jets and the rush of the air against the hull, they don't
attenuate sound in the frequencies of human speech (or baby crying). In
fact, they almost make it worse as they eliminate the white noise which
normally could cover it a bit. However, I use mine with a good headphone
amplifier and an MP3 player; listening to music at the
not-so-loud-that-it's-painful-but-still-fills-your-head level helps block
out almost everything.


--
///---



  #33  
Old September 19th, 2003, 02:27 PM
Dave Fossett
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Noise cancellers (Was: Tokyo with a Very Young Child)

"PTRAVEL" wrote:

I'm on my third pair of noise cancellers. The problem with NC phones is
that, though they were very well on repetitive, low-frequency noise, e.g.
the roar of the jets and the rush of the air against the hull, they don't
attenuate sound in the frequencies of human speech (or baby crying). In
fact, they almost make it worse as they eliminate the white noise which
normally could cover it a bit. However, I use mine with a good headphone
amplifier and an MP3 player; listening to music at the
not-so-loud-that-it's-painful-but-still-fills-your-head level helps block
out almost everything.


I would agree with this advice. I use a NoiseBuster set, which I do find
helps reduce the tiring background noise on long trips, but it doesn't
cancel out intermittent noise such as conversation or announcements.

--
Dave Fossett
Saitama, Japan

  #34  
Old September 20th, 2003, 01:38 AM
Gerry Scott-Moore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Noise cancellers (Was: Tokyo with a Very Young Child)

In article , Dave Fossett
wrote:

"PTRAVEL" wrote:

I'm on my third pair of noise cancellers. The problem with NC phones is
that, though they were very well on repetitive, low-frequency noise, e.g.
the roar of the jets and the rush of the air against the hull, they don't
attenuate sound in the frequencies of human speech (or baby crying). In
fact, they almost make it worse as they eliminate the white noise which
normally could cover it a bit. However, I use mine with a good headphone
amplifier and an MP3 player; listening to music at the
not-so-loud-that-it's-painful-but-still-fills-your-head level helps block
out almost everything.


And which does PTravle use?

I would agree with this advice. I use a NoiseBuster set, which I do find
helps reduce the tiring background noise on long trips, but it doesn't
cancel out intermittent noise such as conversation or announcements.


Anybody used the too-overpriced-to-buy Bose set. A friend bought them
and tried to proselytize to validate his purchase. But after demo'ing
his at home could see my way clear.

--
///---
  #35  
Old September 20th, 2003, 02:25 AM
PTRAVEL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Noise cancellers (Was: Tokyo with a Very Young Child)


"Gerry Scott-Moore" wrote in message
d...
In article , Dave Fossett
wrote:

"PTRAVEL" wrote:

I'm on my third pair of noise cancellers. The problem with NC phones

is
that, though they were very well on repetitive, low-frequency noise,

e.g.
the roar of the jets and the rush of the air against the hull, they

don't
attenuate sound in the frequencies of human speech (or baby crying).

In
fact, they almost make it worse as they eliminate the white noise

which
normally could cover it a bit. However, I use mine with a good

headphone
amplifier and an MP3 player; listening to music at the
not-so-loud-that-it's-painful-but-still-fills-your-head level helps

block
out almost everything.


And which does PTravle use?


My first pair were Sony MD-NC20s. Very nice phones, but they didn't work
with my MP3 player (they picked up control tones from the remote). I got a
pair of Bose QuietComforts, which I've used happily for several years. Last
month, I bought the new Bose QuietComfort II phones. They have better
definition and bass response than the original QuietComfort phones, and are
easier to carry around, too.



I would agree with this advice. I use a NoiseBuster set, which I do find
helps reduce the tiring background noise on long trips, but it doesn't
cancel out intermittent noise such as conversation or announcements.


Anybody used the too-overpriced-to-buy Bose set.


Uh . . yes.

A friend bought them
and tried to proselytize to validate his purchase. But after demo'ing
his at home could see my way clear.


Were they the IIs or the original? My Sonys out-performed the original Bose
QuietComfort phones. The new ones, though, are really quite nice.


--
///---



  #36  
Old September 20th, 2003, 04:50 PM
Gerry Scott-Moore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Noise cancellers (Was: Tokyo with a Very Young Child)

In article , PTRAVEL
wrote:

A friend bought them and tried to proselytize to validate his
purchase. But after demo'ing his at home I couldn't see my way
clear.


Were they the IIs or the original? My Sonys out-performed the
original Bose QuietComfort phones. The new ones, though, are really
quite nice.


After buzzing the website I'm pretty sure they are teh QC 2's. They
were part of a promo only a few months back and they cost, as indicated
at the website a discounted version of $300. Yikes. Damned
comfortable though. One of my problems with headsets is that after 2-3
hours they really begin to hurt the outer-ear unless they are the kind
that fit completely around the outside. That did not seem to be the
case with this set.

--
///---
  #37  
Old September 20th, 2003, 09:07 PM
PTRAVEL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Noise cancellers (Was: Tokyo with a Very Young Child)


"Gerry Scott-Moore" wrote in message
d...
In article , PTRAVEL
wrote:

A friend bought them and tried to proselytize to validate his
purchase. But after demo'ing his at home I couldn't see my way
clear.


Were they the IIs or the original? My Sonys out-performed the
original Bose QuietComfort phones. The new ones, though, are really
quite nice.


After buzzing the website I'm pretty sure they are teh QC 2's. They
were part of a promo only a few months back and they cost, as indicated
at the website a discounted version of $300. Yikes. Damned
comfortable though. One of my problems with headsets is that after 2-3
hours they really begin to hurt the outer-ear unless they are the kind
that fit completely around the outside. That did not seem to be the
case with this set.


I've worn the originals for as much as 12 hours at a time, and the IIs for
4-5 hours. The IIs, in particular, are quite comfortable.


--
///---



  #38  
Old September 21st, 2003, 06:42 AM
Gerry Scott-Moore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Noise cancellers (Was: Tokyo with a Very Young Child)

In article , PTRAVEL
wrote:

Damned comfortable though. One of my problems with headsets is that
after 2-3 hours they really begin to hurt the outer-ear unless they
are the kind that fit completely around the outside. That did not
seem to be the case with this set.


Bad back reference. Discomfort did not seem to be the case with the
QC2's.

I've worn the originals for as much as 12 hours at a time, and the
IIs for 4-5 hours. The IIs, in particular, are quite comfortable.


--
///---
 




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