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European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 28th, 2010, 08:04 AM posted to soc.retirement,rec.travel.europe
Earl Evleth[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,417
Default European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods


I had to handle passport registration for my wife's British Airway
flight to the USA and back. She has a US passport (and French)
so usually has no visa hassles. I registered the required information
twice into a BOA web site (an e-mail requested information) and
each time I logged back on they still did not have it.

The US has a visa waiver policy with most European countries,
as those countries have with the US. It is reciprocal. But
recently the US changed the rules requiring pre-flight information
and a special form be filed via the internet. The European
countries don't hae such a requirement, so the situation is
no loner authentically reciprocal. American egocentric exceptionalism
is always doing this kind of thing.


European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods
By JULIA WERDIGIER
Published: October 27, 2010



LONDON ‹ Several European officials questioned American requirements for
airport security on Wednesday, a day after the chairman of British Airways
criticized Britain for bowing too quickly to Washington¹s demands.
Add to Portfolio

The chairman, Martin Broughton, said at a conference on Tuesday that Britain
should not ³kowtow to the Americans every time they wanted something done²
with aviation security procedures.

Especially irritating, Mr. Broughton said, according to The Financial Times,
was the requirement that passengers take off their shoes and remove their
laptops from their luggage during security checks. The practice should be
abandoned, he said. A representative for British Airways confirmed that he
made the remarks.

The complaints added to the discontent and frustration among passengers,
airlines and airport operators in Europe over the ever-changing safety
requirements and the long waiting times at security screening points in
airports. Executives from other carriers and airports echoed the criticisms
from British Airways.

Some airlines have repeatedly called for more sophisticated scanning
machines to replace procedural safety measures like requiring passengers to
pack liquids separately.

Virgin Atlantic said on Wednesday that it had pleaded ³for many years² for
new security procedures that would be ³effective but quicker and less
intrusive on our passengers.²

Lufthansa of Germany was more circumspect, The Associated Press reported. A
Lufthansa spokesman, Jan Baerwald, told The A.P. that airlines have ³had
more and more regulations since 9/11.²

But, he added, ³I¹m not going to say it is Lufthansa¹s opinion that it is
too strict ‹ that is not for us to say.²

BAA, the company that operates Heathrow airport, argued that there was room
to consider an overhaul of the current safety regulation and said that it
was ³committed to ensuring passengers are safe and that we also constantly
improve the levels of service we offer.²

Mr. Broughton specifically criticized the United States for burdening
European airports and airlines with what he called ³redundant² checks, added
a new twist to the debate.

He also criticized Washington for not imposing certain safety restrictions
on domestic flights that it requires from flights to and from the United
States.

Even within Britain, however, there have been discussions about updated
airport security. A plan by the British government this year to introduce
body scanners at airports was met with strong opposition in Parliament. The
new coalition government is now reviewing the need for scanners and whether
they violate the privacy of passengers. (The United States has started to
introduce body scanners in some airports.)

Mike Carrivick, chief executive of the Board of Airline Representatives,
which represents more than 80 airlines, including British Airways, Delta and
Continental, joined Mr. Broughton¹s call for a safety overhaul and said
³let¹s step back and have a look at the whole situation.²

³Every time there is a new security scare, an extra layer is added on to
procedures,² Mr. Carrivick said. ³Let¹s look at technology and see what we
can do so that passengers don¹t have to take off their shoes.²

The Transportation Security Administration said Wednesday in Washington that
officials ³constantly review and evolve our security measures based on the
latest intelligence.² It also said it ³works closely with our international
partners to ensure the best possible security.²

The British government on Wednesday distanced itself from the debate and
said that the additional security rules requested by Washington were a
matter for the airlines flying passengers to the United States. But a
representative for the Department for Transport in Britain added that the
coalition government was reviewing its airport security regulation and
considering giving airport operators more flexibility in how they meet
certain security goals.

British airport security regulation, like that of other European countries,
is based on standards set by the European Union. ³Our security measures go
further than the minimum set by the E.U., and we have one of the safest
systems in the world,² the British airport representative said.

The European Commission also criticized air security measures for entry to
the United States , saying that a so-called Electronic System for Travel
Authorization was impeding travel, difficult to comply with and raised a
possible threat to privacy.

The system requires European passengers to register before traveling to the
United States, which ³represents a burden for European citizens,² Michele
Cercone, a spokesman for the commission, told a news conference in Brussels.
The procedure is also ³inconsistent with the commitment by the U.S. to
facilitate trans-Atlantic mobility.²

Mr. Cercone said commission authorities were examining whether the system
was ³tantamount² to introducing visas on all European Union nationals.
Citizens from Poland, Bulgaria and Romania must get a visa to travel to the
United States. And while citizens from all other European Union countries
are covered by a visa waiver program, they must still register. An estimated
13 million Europeans traveled to the United States in 2009.

He said that the system had become vulnerable to ³scam² Web sites and
³fraudulent operations.² That, he said, should prompt the United States to
³give a second thought² to the system.

In addition, it was unclear to the European authorities whether privacy was
adequately protected, even when Europeans were able to pay for the
registration by credit card. Mr. Cercone said the commission wanted to know
whether credit card details were retained or used for purposes other than
those for which they were collected, and he suggested that there needed to
be safeguards.

  #2  
Old October 28th, 2010, 01:52 PM posted to soc.retirement,rec.travel.europe
mikeos
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 177
Default European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods

On 28/10/2010 08:04, Earl Evleth wrote:


Mr. Broughton specifically criticized the United States for burdening
European airports and airlines with what he called ³redundant² checks, added
a new twist to the debate.

He also criticized Washington for not imposing certain safety restrictions
on domestic flights that it requires from flights to and from the United
States.


Presumably that's because US authorities are under the impression that
all terrorists come from this side of the Atlantic. They are wrong of
course.
  #3  
Old October 28th, 2010, 07:07 PM posted to soc.retirement,rec.travel.europe
Runge 124
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 150
Default Crosspost evleth brings you OT stuff boring stuff about the US again

Old polluter

"Earl Evleth" a écrit dans le message de groupe de
discussion : ...

I had to handle passport registration for my wife's British Airway
flight to the USA and back. She has a US passport (and French)
so usually has no visa hassles. I registered the required information
twice into a BOA web site (an e-mail requested information) and
each time I logged back on they still did not have it.

The US has a visa waiver policy with most European countries,
as those countries have with the US. It is reciprocal. But
recently the US changed the rules requiring pre-flight information
and a special form be filed via the internet. The European
countries don't hae such a requirement, so the situation is
no loner authentically reciprocal. American egocentric exceptionalism
is always doing this kind of thing.


European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods
By JULIA WERDIGIER
Published: October 27, 2010



LONDON Several European officials questioned American requirements for
airport security on Wednesday, a day after the chairman of British Airways
criticized Britain for bowing too quickly to Washington¹s demands.
Add to Portfolio

The chairman, Martin Broughton, said at a conference on Tuesday that
Britain
should not ³kowtow to the Americans every time they wanted something done²
with aviation security procedures.

Especially irritating, Mr. Broughton said, according to The Financial
Times,
was the requirement that passengers take off their shoes and remove their
laptops from their luggage during security checks. The practice should be
abandoned, he said. A representative for British Airways confirmed that he
made the remarks.

The complaints added to the discontent and frustration among passengers,
airlines and airport operators in Europe over the ever-changing safety
requirements and the long waiting times at security screening points in
airports. Executives from other carriers and airports echoed the
criticisms
from British Airways.

Some airlines have repeatedly called for more sophisticated scanning
machines to replace procedural safety measures like requiring passengers
to
pack liquids separately.

Virgin Atlantic said on Wednesday that it had pleaded ³for many years² for
new security procedures that would be ³effective but quicker and less
intrusive on our passengers.²

Lufthansa of Germany was more circumspect, The Associated Press reported.
A
Lufthansa spokesman, Jan Baerwald, told The A.P. that airlines have ³had
more and more regulations since 9/11.²

But, he added, ³I¹m not going to say it is Lufthansa¹s opinion that it is
too strict that is not for us to say.²

BAA, the company that operates Heathrow airport, argued that there was
room
to consider an overhaul of the current safety regulation and said that it
was ³committed to ensuring passengers are safe and that we also constantly
improve the levels of service we offer.²

Mr. Broughton specifically criticized the United States for burdening
European airports and airlines with what he called ³redundant² checks,
added
a new twist to the debate.

He also criticized Washington for not imposing certain safety restrictions
on domestic flights that it requires from flights to and from the United
States.

Even within Britain, however, there have been discussions about updated
airport security. A plan by the British government this year to introduce
body scanners at airports was met with strong opposition in Parliament.
The
new coalition government is now reviewing the need for scanners and
whether
they violate the privacy of passengers. (The United States has started to
introduce body scanners in some airports.)

Mike Carrivick, chief executive of the Board of Airline Representatives,
which represents more than 80 airlines, including British Airways, Delta
and
Continental, joined Mr. Broughton¹s call for a safety overhaul and said
³let¹s step back and have a look at the whole situation.²

³Every time there is a new security scare, an extra layer is added on to
procedures,² Mr. Carrivick said. ³Let¹s look at technology and see what we
can do so that passengers don¹t have to take off their shoes.²

The Transportation Security Administration said Wednesday in Washington
that
officials ³constantly review and evolve our security measures based on the
latest intelligence.² It also said it ³works closely with our
international
partners to ensure the best possible security.²

The British government on Wednesday distanced itself from the debate and
said that the additional security rules requested by Washington were a
matter for the airlines flying passengers to the United States. But a
representative for the Department for Transport in Britain added that the
coalition government was reviewing its airport security regulation and
considering giving airport operators more flexibility in how they meet
certain security goals.

British airport security regulation, like that of other European
countries,
is based on standards set by the European Union. ³Our security measures go
further than the minimum set by the E.U., and we have one of the safest
systems in the world,² the British airport representative said.

The European Commission also criticized air security measures for entry to
the United States , saying that a so-called Electronic System for Travel
Authorization was impeding travel, difficult to comply with and raised a
possible threat to privacy.

The system requires European passengers to register before traveling to
the
United States, which ³represents a burden for European citizens,² Michele
Cercone, a spokesman for the commission, told a news conference in
Brussels.
The procedure is also ³inconsistent with the commitment by the U.S. to
facilitate trans-Atlantic mobility.²

Mr. Cercone said commission authorities were examining whether the system
was ³tantamount² to introducing visas on all European Union nationals.
Citizens from Poland, Bulgaria and Romania must get a visa to travel to
the
United States. And while citizens from all other European Union countries
are covered by a visa waiver program, they must still register. An
estimated
13 million Europeans traveled to the United States in 2009.

He said that the system had become vulnerable to ³scam² Web sites and
³fraudulent operations.² That, he said, should prompt the United States to
³give a second thought² to the system.

In addition, it was unclear to the European authorities whether privacy
was
adequately protected, even when Europeans were able to pay for the
registration by credit card. Mr. Cercone said the commission wanted to
know
whether credit card details were retained or used for purposes other than
those for which they were collected, and he suggested that there needed to
be safeguards.

  #4  
Old October 30th, 2010, 07:38 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Jean O'Boyle[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 624
Default European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods


"Earl Evleth" wrote in message
...

I had to handle passport registration for my wife's British Airway
flight to the USA and back. She has a US passport (and French)
so usually has no visa hassles. I registered the required information
twice into a BOA web site (an e-mail requested information) and
each time I logged back on they still did not have it.

The US has a visa waiver policy with most European countries,
as those countries have with the US. It is reciprocal. But
recently the US changed the rules requiring pre-flight information
and a special form be filed via the internet. The European
countries don't hae such a requirement, so the situation is
no loner authentically reciprocal. American egocentric exceptionalism
is always doing this kind of thing.




Why Earl...you sound just like Obama! No wonder some Europeans are so
enamored of him! They love to bash the US, too!
But as you will see next Tuesday, how long that love affair with Obama has
lasted. People who were so gullible during the last election finally are
seeing the "real Obama!" Yesterday, when I voted at an early voting site,
the parking lot was full with cars lined up along the highway, waiting to
get a parking place in order to vote. And this was EARLY voting...Wait until
election day on Nov. 2nd! Lines inside the building were very long...I
counted four wheel-chaired people in line ahead of us. People are really
turning out for this election! A president who deliberately goes against
the will of 70% of the people in the country by passing unwanted legislation
is not popular, believe me! His rating has gone below President Bush's now
and he has only been president for not quite two years compared to Bush's
eight years! Funny how people not even living here think they know what is
really happening in the USA.

As for security...what happened yesterday with those flights containing
"packages" from Yemen might just put a different slant on all this
criticism...I know...they were commercial transports, although one did deal
with a passenger flight from the Emirates. Kudos and a big thank you to
those in Saudi Arabia for the alerts and the ones at the airport in England!

I will gladly take off my shoes for my (and other's) safety! Things change,
Earl, and it is not up the airlines whose primary interest is profit, but
for the Airport Security Officials to determine. They see what is happening
behind the scene...we aren't privy to it all or we probably would hesitate
about flying...period...The first time a plane goes down, it is people like
you will yell the loudest!

By the way, pre-flight information online is required by each airline that I
use...no problem for me and I fly often....in country and international.

--Jean




  #5  
Old October 30th, 2010, 10:01 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
erilar
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,142
Default European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods

In article ,
"Jean O'Boyle" wrote:

I will gladly take off my shoes for my (and other's) safety!


That's fine for young people, but until they give me a place to sit down
to take them off and another to put them back on, I'll continue to call
it age discrimination.

--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist


http://www.mosaictelecom.com/~erilarlo
  #6  
Old October 30th, 2010, 10:30 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
James Silverton[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 212
Default European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods

erilar wrote on Sat, 30 Oct 2010 16:01:52 -0500:

I will gladly take off my shoes for my (and other's) safety!


That's fine for young people, but until they give me a place
to sit down to take them off and another to put them back on,
I'll continue to call it age discrimination.


I'll quite happily submit to back-scatter scanning and take my shoes off
if required; to hell with civil liberties protests. If I were sure of
their guilt, I'd favor disappearing over the sea, Argentinean style, for
Quaedists.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

  #7  
Old October 30th, 2010, 11:29 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Markku Grönroos[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 179
Default European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods

31.10.2010 0:01, erilar kirjoitti:
In ,
"Jean wrote:

I will gladly take off my shoes for my (and other's) safety!


That's fine for young people, but until they give me a place to sit down
to take them off and another to put them back on, I'll continue to call
it age discrimination.

Transit scheme is dead at the US airports now. Transit passengers must
cross the border to the USA even if their next destination is abroad. In
the past you arrived in an airport and walked to a proper gate and flew
away.

Nowadays it is different and transit passengers arriving in USA from
abroad and departing from the same airport to a destination abroad take
following steps:

1. you must fill in so called "ESTA" application online (or have a visa)
which is good for two years.

2. At the airport you have a prefilled document for the immigration (you
go through the border to the US soil). Depending how busy the airport is
there may be a lengthy wait on queue until it will be your turn to
deliver finger prints.

3. The next process has been introduced last year and I don't have a
faintest idea what it has to do with "security":

Even if luggage is checked to the destination outside the USA it will be
collected by the owner at the US airport.

4. You walk to the customs (because you cross the border) a prefilled
document in hand. Some queueing may take place. Your belongings are or
are not checked. You walk through out from the customs area and there
you are - in the USA!

5. Because you don't mind to drag your heavy luggage, you leave it to
the luggage drop area.

Now you are ready to go back there where you just came from.

6. Because you are in an area of free access to anyone and you are going
to an area designated only to passengers with a valid ticket you must
queue once again as is usual in these days at airports: you leave the
USA so there will be a security check. While queueing there is probably
a sign somewhere telling our exhausted passenger to KEEP THINGS SIMPLE
and have the travelling documents in hand and wear off the shoes (the
floor is naturally quite filthy).


Has Osama bin Laden won the war against the American legislator and the
airport authority? He definitely has done so!

If one can decently fly in a route which does not include US American
ports then it should be used.

  #8  
Old October 30th, 2010, 11:54 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
S Viemeister[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 407
Default European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods

On 10/30/2010 5:01 PM, erilar wrote:
In ,
"Jean wrote:

I will gladly take off my shoes for my (and other's) safety!


That's fine for young people, but until they give me a place to sit down
to take them off and another to put them back on, I'll continue to call
it age discrimination.

I used to travel in my hiking boots, to avoid having to pack them - now
I wear a pair of slip-on clogs.
  #9  
Old October 31st, 2010, 03:29 AM posted to rec.travel.europe
Jean O'Boyle[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 624
Default European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods


"erilar" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Jean O'Boyle" wrote:

I will gladly take off my shoes for my (and other's) safety!


That's fine for young people, but until they give me a place to sit down
to take them off and another to put them back on, I'll continue to call
it age discrimination.


LOL, Erilar...I'm not a young person either...I wear slip on shoes or
sandals. There are usually chairs in the back of the security scan area.

--Jean


  #10  
Old October 31st, 2010, 03:57 AM posted to rec.travel.europe
erilar
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,142
Default European Officials Broadly Criticize U.S. Airport Security Methods

In article ,
"Jean O'Boyle" wrote:

"erilar" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Jean O'Boyle" wrote:

I will gladly take off my shoes for my (and other's) safety!


That's fine for young people, but until they give me a place to sit down
to take them off and another to put them back on, I'll continue to call
it age discrimination.


LOL, Erilar...I'm not a young person either...I wear slip on shoes or
sandals. There are usually chairs in the back of the security scan area.


I don't check luggage. The hiking boots I wear all trip are my sole
footwear. I'm not going to pay extra to check a suitcase just to make
things simpler for TSA. They could provide a chair to take them OFF.
Heathrow, for all its faults, does.

--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist


http://www.mosaictelecom.com/~erilarlo
 




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