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Electricity Question



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 20th, 2007, 03:13 AM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
Janet Wilder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 439
Default Electricity Question

Will I need an electricity adapter in Cairns and at Ayers Rock to plug
in my battery charger for the rechargeable batteries for my camera? The
charger is United States-flavor electric.

TIA
--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
  #2  
Old September 20th, 2007, 08:58 AM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
John H
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 113
Default Electricity Question

Hi Janet,
Cairns like rest of Australia is 240 volts US is 110 volts.
SO if your appliance is shown as multi voltage ie 110 - 240 then all you
will need is an adapter plug to go from US two round pin horizontally in
line TO the Australian 3 pin.
Lots of chargers are multi voltage so you may indeed be OK for the voltage
situation
Have a look at this site for the plug shape
http://www.accesscomms.com.au/Reference/powerplug.htm

If you cant buy an adaptor in US then you should be able to buy one in
Cairns (at least at the airport if not the town).regards
John H

"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
Will I need an electricity adapter in Cairns and at Ayers Rock to plug in
my battery charger for the rechargeable batteries for my camera? The
charger is United States-flavor electric.

TIA
--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life



  #3  
Old September 20th, 2007, 09:28 PM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
MI
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 106
Default Electricity Question




On 9/20/07 12:58 AM, in article , "John H"
wrote:

Hi Janet,
Cairns like rest of Australia is 240 volts US is 110 volts.
SO if your appliance is shown as multi voltage ie 110 - 240 then all you
will need is an adapter plug to go from US two round pin horizontally in
line TO the Australian 3 pin.
Lots of chargers are multi voltage so you may indeed be OK for the voltage
situation
Have a look at this site for the plug shape
http://www.accesscomms.com.au/Reference/powerplug.htm

If you cant buy an adaptor in US then you should be able to buy one in
Cairns (at least at the airport if not the town).regards
John H

"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
Will I need an electricity adapter in Cairns and at Ayers Rock to plug in
my battery charger for the rechargeable batteries for my camera? The
charger is United States-flavor electric.

TIA
--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life



The CAA in Canada sells adapters and transformers (not needed much any more)
for all types of plugs. I would think that the AAA in the States would sell
them too. Don't cost much. Australia uses the J plug.

Martha T2 Canada

  #4  
Old September 20th, 2007, 10:20 PM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
kangaroo16
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 222
Default Electricity Question

On Thu, 20 Sep 2007 17:28:45 +0930, "John H"
wrote in
:

Hi Janet,
Cairns like rest of Australia is 240 volts US is 110 volts.
SO if your appliance is shown as multi voltage ie 110 - 240 then all you
will need is an adapter plug to go from US two round pin horizontally in
line TO the Australian 3 pin.


Essentially correct, but US voltage is a nominal 110-220 volts
RMS at 60 Hertz [ cycle] , and uses a non polarized plug with
two vertical flat pins.

| |

Australia is a nominal 220-240 volt, 50 Hertz, uses a three pin
polarized plug with two angled flat plugs for active and neutral,
and a longer flat pin for a safety earth or "ground" in US.

/ \

|
Lots of chargers are multi voltage so you may indeed be OK for the voltage
situation
Have a look at this site for the plug shape
http://www.accesscomms.com.au/Reference/powerplug.htm

If you cant buy an adaptor in US then you should be able to buy one in
Cairns (at least at the airport if not the town).regards
John H


I would agree with the "should be able to", but that doesn't mean
you actually "will be able to" :-) It might be more convenient
and probably cheaper to buy one in the USA.

Some tourists seem to assume that an "adaptor" plug changes the
voltage, which it doesn't. Make sure the power supply on the
appliance you intend to use has a switch to change the voltage
from 240 volts to 120 volts, and remember to switch to proper
voltage before plugging it in!

Have heard of tourists forgetting to switch an electric razor to
the 220-240 volt range then trying to use it. The results can
be both spectacular and hazardous.

Admittedly, this probably happens more often when someone
assumes the voltage is the same in Australia and the US and
simply bends the blades of a US appliance at an angle to fit
an Australian outlet. This is not advisable.

So what if Janet's charger doesn't have a voltage change switch?
In that case, she would have to find an adapter that includes a
transformer, or buy a 240 volt charger to charge her batteries at
the proper low voltage and polarity.

Am sure if she takes her charger down to a camera store in the
USA, or checks the net, she can get more info.

I don't expect that US tourists would bring a portable TV set on
a trip, but if so, it won't work in Australia. The US uses the
obsolete NTSC standard rather than PAL used here. Channel
allocations are also different.

If bringing a mobile phone, they should check if it will work
here.

Incidentally, on a different topic, currency rates constantly
change. Radio news at 7.08 AM here says that due to loss of
value in US$ it is on a par with Canadian dollar for the first
time in 30 years. As to Aussie dollar:

At the moment
Live rates at 2007.09.20 21:13:37 UTC
1.00 USD 1.16020 AUD
United States Dollars Australia Dollars
1 USD = 1.16020 AUD 1 AUD = 0.861921 USD
http://www.xe.com/ucc/convert.cgi

Cheers,
kangaroo16
[I usually post on misc.immigration Australia+ NZ.]




"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
.. .
Will I need an electricity adapter in Cairns and at Ayers Rock to plug in
my battery charger for the rechargeable batteries for my camera? The
charger is United States-flavor electric.

TIA
--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life


  #5  
Old September 21st, 2007, 12:37 AM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
Janet Wilder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 439
Default Electricity Question

kangaroo16 wrote:
On Thu, 20 Sep 2007 17:28:45 +0930, "John H"
wrote in
:

Hi Janet,
Cairns like rest of Australia is 240 volts US is 110 volts.
SO if your appliance is shown as multi voltage ie 110 - 240 then all you
will need is an adapter plug to go from US two round pin horizontally in
line TO the Australian 3 pin.


Essentially correct, but US voltage is a nominal 110-220 volts
RMS at 60 Hertz [ cycle] , and uses a non polarized plug with
two vertical flat pins.

| |

Australia is a nominal 220-240 volt, 50 Hertz, uses a three pin
polarized plug with two angled flat plugs for active and neutral,
and a longer flat pin for a safety earth or "ground" in US.

/ \

|
Lots of chargers are multi voltage so you may indeed be OK for the voltage
situation
Have a look at this site for the plug shape
http://www.accesscomms.com.au/Reference/powerplug.htm

If you cant buy an adaptor in US then you should be able to buy one in
Cairns (at least at the airport if not the town).regards
John H


I would agree with the "should be able to", but that doesn't mean
you actually "will be able to" :-) It might be more convenient
and probably cheaper to buy one in the USA.

Some tourists seem to assume that an "adaptor" plug changes the
voltage, which it doesn't. Make sure the power supply on the
appliance you intend to use has a switch to change the voltage
from 240 volts to 120 volts, and remember to switch to proper
voltage before plugging it in!

Have heard of tourists forgetting to switch an electric razor to
the 220-240 volt range then trying to use it. The results can
be both spectacular and hazardous.

Admittedly, this probably happens more often when someone
assumes the voltage is the same in Australia and the US and
simply bends the blades of a US appliance at an angle to fit
an Australian outlet. This is not advisable.

So what if Janet's charger doesn't have a voltage change switch?
In that case, she would have to find an adapter that includes a
transformer, or buy a 240 volt charger to charge her batteries at
the proper low voltage and polarity.

Am sure if she takes her charger down to a camera store in the
USA, or checks the net, she can get more info.

I don't expect that US tourists would bring a portable TV set on
a trip, but if so, it won't work in Australia. The US uses the
obsolete NTSC standard rather than PAL used here. Channel
allocations are also different.

If bringing a mobile phone, they should check if it will work
here.

Incidentally, on a different topic, currency rates constantly
change. Radio news at 7.08 AM here says that due to loss of
value in US$ it is on a par with Canadian dollar for the first
time in 30 years. As to Aussie dollar:

At the moment
Live rates at 2007.09.20 21:13:37 UTC
1.00 USD 1.16020 AUD
United States Dollars Australia Dollars
1 USD = 1.16020 AUD 1 AUD = 0.861921 USD
http://www.xe.com/ucc/convert.cgi

Cheers,
kangaroo16
[I usually post on misc.immigration Australia+ NZ.]



"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
Will I need an electricity adapter in Cairns and at Ayers Rock to plug in
my battery charger for the rechargeable batteries for my camera? The
charger is United States-flavor electric.

TIA


I'm rather electrically challenged but I think I managed to figure
things out.

I looked at my charger. It has 2 plugs. It will work off 12V, like a
lighter in an automobile with the sausage-shaped plug and regular
electricity with one of those boxy converter plugs. The "input" is 120V
AC, 60Hz 13W and "output" 12V DC 500mA. It does not have a "voltage
switch" I bought it in WalMart two years ago with 4 rechargeable
batteries for under $20, so I wouldn't expect it would be so fancy.

I don't think my charger will work even with an adapter. I'd best bring
extra batteries (assuming the TSA will let me pack them g)

We only spend 6 days on land in Australia then we go on a cruise ship to
sail to Melbourne then over to New Zealand for a sail around the
islands. I know from prior cruises that the charger will work aboard ship.

Thank you all for your help. Having enough extra batteries will assure
me that I'll be able to take many pictures of Australia.

Janet

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
  #6  
Old September 21st, 2007, 01:59 AM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
John H
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 113
Default Electricity Question

Kangaroo216 stated
(1) "but US voltage is a nominal 110-220 volts"
Since when?
I have never known any supply to fluctuate that much!
I think you may mean 110 -120 volts

(2) " in US"
I think YOU mean AUST.

(3) "It might be more convenient
and probably cheaper to buy one in the USA".
Using your vernacular, maybe "probably",
but would depend on many factors such as store at which purchased,
whether it was on sale etc. all which are actually about as relevant as your
statement.

(4) "Some tourists seem to assume that an "adaptor" plug changes the
voltage, which it doesn't.

Conjecture on your part!

(5) "Make sure the power supply on the
appliance you intend to use has a switch to change the voltage
from 240 volts to 120 volts, and remember to switch to proper
voltage before plugging it in!

AND (6)
So what if Janet's charger doesn't have a voltage change switch?
In that case, she would have to find an adapter that includes a
transformer, or buy a 240 volt charger to charge her batteries at
the proper low voltage and polarity.


Lots of appliances are nowadays "multi" voltage and will cover from
110v to 240v and 50 - 60 Hz without any voltage or frequency switch of any
kind.
Laptops are one that "springs to mind" as mine does exactly that.
My battery charger for the digital camera does, and also has the ability to
have the plug slide
off the back of the unit and another countries plug slid in to replace it
and no other "transformer " or anything else needed.

Your answer would only apply if her appliance was of an earlier vintage that
would only work on 110 volts,
thus need a 240v to 110v step down device, usually (but not always) a
transformer.
+++

Frequency difference (50Hz to 60Hz) on a small charger would have negligible
effect,
perhaps slight heating of the unit depending upon whether it is has a wound
transformer in unit .

The Earth pin may or may not be longer, The standard states 1.63 mm for all
of them,
some supplied are same length and some slightly longer, in fact some are
actually larger in height
and width ie 15 amp socket, where earth pin is same length, wider,
and higher, so they wont fit into the standard 10 amp socket,
but the standard 10 amp plug will fit into a 15 amp socket.
There is also a 20 Amp plug & socket, where all pins are wider (thicker),
but rarely ever seen by 90% of population, never seen in domestic premises
AFAIK.


Also most small appliances do not even have the 3rd (earth pin) anyway as
they are invariably double insulated.
No double insulated appliance has to have the 3rd (earth) pin, but here
again some are supplied with plug that has it
but it is not wired/terminated as the cable to it is only two core anyway.
See same url but another page ie
http://www.accesscomms.com.au/Refere...ugVariants.htm

+++
The url I supplied showed poster what it looked like a damn sight more than
your "stick drawing",
and they would surely know what their own plug looked like.

BTW Do you always nitpick things others say? What was given was basically
all the person needed to know,
using her post as the basis for the reply.
The poster didnt even elaborate other than to say it was a charger unit for
a camera.
viz.
I would agree with the "should be able to", but that doesn't mean
you actually "will be able to" :-) It might be more convenient
and probably cheaper to buy one in the USA.

+++
Whilst the rest of your reply to Janet was very informative, it was not
anything the poster asked about,
Hell! I wonder what your reply to, a child who asked the question :"where do
I come from" would be?
A diatribe on the reproductive systems of both male and female, which would
naturally be totally overkill.

Perhaps you should jump back into your Joeys pouch.

John H

"kangaroo16" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 20 Sep 2007 17:28:45 +0930, "John H"
wrote in
:

Hi Janet,
Cairns like rest of Australia is 240 volts US is 110 volts.
SO if your appliance is shown as multi voltage ie 110 - 240 then all you
will need is an adapter plug to go from US two round pin horizontally in
line TO the Australian 3 pin.


Essentially correct, but US voltage is a nominal 110-220 volts
RMS at 60 Hertz [ cycle] , and uses a non polarized plug with
two vertical flat pins.

| |

Australia is a nominal 220-240 volt, 50 Hertz, uses a three pin
polarized plug with two angled flat plugs for active and neutral,
and a longer flat pin for a safety earth or "ground" in US.

/ \

|
Lots of chargers are multi voltage so you may indeed be OK for the voltage
situation
Have a look at this site for the plug shape
http://www.accesscomms.com.au/Reference/powerplug.htm

If you cant buy an adaptor in US then you should be able to buy one in
Cairns (at least at the airport if not the town).regards
John H


I would agree with the "should be able to", but that doesn't mean
you actually "will be able to" :-) It might be more convenient
and probably cheaper to buy one in the USA.

Some tourists seem to assume that an "adaptor" plug changes the
voltage, which it doesn't. Make sure the power supply on the
appliance you intend to use has a switch to change the voltage
from 240 volts to 120 volts, and remember to switch to proper
voltage before plugging it in!

Have heard of tourists forgetting to switch an electric razor to
the 220-240 volt range then trying to use it. The results can
be both spectacular and hazardous.

Admittedly, this probably happens more often when someone
assumes the voltage is the same in Australia and the US and
simply bends the blades of a US appliance at an angle to fit
an Australian outlet. This is not advisable.

So what if Janet's charger doesn't have a voltage change switch?
In that case, she would have to find an adapter that includes a
transformer, or buy a 240 volt charger to charge her batteries at
the proper low voltage and polarity.

Am sure if she takes her charger down to a camera store in the
USA, or checks the net, she can get more info.

I don't expect that US tourists would bring a portable TV set on
a trip, but if so, it won't work in Australia. The US uses the
obsolete NTSC standard rather than PAL used here. Channel
allocations are also different.

If bringing a mobile phone, they should check if it will work
here.

Incidentally, on a different topic, currency rates constantly
change. Radio news at 7.08 AM here says that due to loss of
value in US$ it is on a par with Canadian dollar for the first
time in 30 years. As to Aussie dollar:

At the moment
Live rates at 2007.09.20 21:13:37 UTC
1.00 USD 1.16020 AUD
United States Dollars Australia Dollars
1 USD = 1.16020 AUD 1 AUD = 0.861921 USD
http://www.xe.com/ucc/convert.cgi

Cheers,
kangaroo16
[I usually post on misc.immigration Australia+ NZ.]




"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
. ..
Will I need an electricity adapter in Cairns and at Ayers Rock to plug
in
my battery charger for the rechargeable batteries for my camera? The
charger is United States-flavor electric.

TIA
--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life




  #7  
Old September 21st, 2007, 02:13 AM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
John H
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 113
Default Electricity Question

Further to my original reply to Janet,
Now that you state that the unit has a single voltage input of 120 volts
60Hz & consumption of 13w.
Then I make the following suggestion.
The majority (but not all) of our hotels have a multi country plug accepted
110v power outlet
in their bathrooms/shower area etc.

This outlet is for low wattage appliances only.

This outlet is normally for shavers, but the small wattage (13W) of your
battery charger should be
OK for using that plug, as most electric shavers are in excess of that
wattage.

It sounds like you are bringing the unit anyway for whilst you are on a
cruise,
so try it in the hotel outlet. (assuming you are using hotels in Aust.)

John H

"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
kangaroo16 wrote:
On Thu, 20 Sep 2007 17:28:45 +0930, "John H"
wrote in
:

Hi Janet,
Cairns like rest of Australia is 240 volts US is 110 volts.
SO if your appliance is shown as multi voltage ie 110 - 240 then all you
will need is an adapter plug to go from US two round pin horizontally in
line TO the Australian 3 pin.


Essentially correct, but US voltage is a nominal 110-220 volts
RMS at 60 Hertz [ cycle] , and uses a non polarized plug with
two vertical flat pins. | |

Australia is a nominal 220-240 volt, 50 Hertz, uses a three pin
polarized plug with two angled flat plugs for active and neutral,
and a longer flat pin for a safety earth or "ground" in US. / \

|
Lots of chargers are multi voltage so you may indeed be OK for the
voltage situation
Have a look at this site for the plug shape
http://www.accesscomms.com.au/Reference/powerplug.htm
If you cant buy an adaptor in US then you should be able to buy one in
Cairns (at least at the airport if not the town).regards
John H


I would agree with the "should be able to", but that doesn't mean
you actually "will be able to" :-) It might be more convenient
and probably cheaper to buy one in the USA.

Some tourists seem to assume that an "adaptor" plug changes the
voltage, which it doesn't. Make sure the power supply on the
appliance you intend to use has a switch to change the voltage
from 240 volts to 120 volts, and remember to switch to proper
voltage before plugging it in!

Have heard of tourists forgetting to switch an electric razor to
the 220-240 volt range then trying to use it. The results can
be both spectacular and hazardous.

Admittedly, this probably happens more often when someone
assumes the voltage is the same in Australia and the US and
simply bends the blades of a US appliance at an angle to fit
an Australian outlet. This is not advisable.

So what if Janet's charger doesn't have a voltage change switch?
In that case, she would have to find an adapter that includes a
transformer, or buy a 240 volt charger to charge her batteries at
the proper low voltage and polarity. Am sure if she takes her charger
down to a camera store in the
USA, or checks the net, she can get more info.

I don't expect that US tourists would bring a portable TV set on
a trip, but if so, it won't work in Australia. The US uses the
obsolete NTSC standard rather than PAL used here. Channel
allocations are also different.

If bringing a mobile phone, they should check if it will work
here.

Incidentally, on a different topic, currency rates constantly
change. Radio news at 7.08 AM here says that due to loss of
value in US$ it is on a par with Canadian dollar for the first
time in 30 years. As to Aussie dollar:

At the moment Live rates at 2007.09.20 21:13:37 UTC
1.00 USD 1.16020 AUD
United States Dollars Australia Dollars
1 USD = 1.16020 AUD 1 AUD = 0.861921 USD
http://www.xe.com/ucc/convert.cgi

Cheers,
kangaroo16
[I usually post on misc.immigration Australia+ NZ.]



"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
Will I need an electricity adapter in Cairns and at Ayers Rock to plug
in my battery charger for the rechargeable batteries for my camera? The
charger is United States-flavor electric.

TIA


I'm rather electrically challenged but I think I managed to figure things
out.

I looked at my charger. It has 2 plugs. It will work off 12V, like a
lighter in an automobile with the sausage-shaped plug and regular
electricity with one of those boxy converter plugs. The "input" is 120V
AC, 60Hz 13W and "output" 12V DC 500mA. It does not have a "voltage
switch" I bought it in WalMart two years ago with 4 rechargeable batteries
for under $20, so I wouldn't expect it would be so fancy.

I don't think my charger will work even with an adapter. I'd best bring
extra batteries (assuming the TSA will let me pack them g)

We only spend 6 days on land in Australia then we go on a cruise ship to
sail to Melbourne then over to New Zealand for a sail around the islands.
I know from prior cruises that the charger will work aboard ship.

Thank you all for your help. Having enough extra batteries will assure me
that I'll be able to take many pictures of Australia.

Janet

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life



  #8  
Old September 21st, 2007, 03:26 AM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
Janet Wilder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 439
Default Electricity Question

John H wrote:
Further to my original reply to Janet,
Now that you state that the unit has a single voltage input of 120 volts
60Hz & consumption of 13w.
Then I make the following suggestion.
The majority (but not all) of our hotels have a multi country plug accepted
110v power outlet
in their bathrooms/shower area etc.

This outlet is for low wattage appliances only.

This outlet is normally for shavers, but the small wattage (13W) of your
battery charger should be
OK for using that plug, as most electric shavers are in excess of that
wattage.

It sounds like you are bringing the unit anyway for whilst you are on a
cruise,
so try it in the hotel outlet. (assuming you are using hotels in Aust.)


I will take the little battery charger with me. I'm also packing several
changes of non-rechargeable batteries. The camera uses 4 AA batteries. I
don't know if they sell the same kind of AA batteries in Australia so
I'll just bring my own along. This is my first trip outside of North
America that I was not journeying on a cruise ship. I know the
electricity in Canada and Mexico would work, but Australia is a
different continent g

I did check the web sites of the 3 hotels we will be staying at and none
of them gave any information about electricity. They seem to be pretty
upscale establishments. In Sydney it's the Grace Hotel, at Ayers Rock
it's Desert Gardens Hotel and at Cairns it's Mantra Treetops Resort.
There is lots of information about amenities but nothing about electricity.

PS: I can't wait to fill the tub and watch the water circle the drain in
the opposite direction g

With deepest appreciation for all y'all's assistance,

Janet

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
  #9  
Old September 21st, 2007, 05:05 AM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
AlmostBob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 46
Default Electricity Question

Hi Janet
Am an Aussie living in Canada
Just about every department store in Aus sells the same alkaline
rechargeable battery kit with a 240V charger and 4/8 batteries
Grandcell is one brandname.
brought my batteries with me, and brought a WalMart "Pure Energy" charger
kit, now have twice as many batteries and a charger for each continent, $20

watch for dropbears

--
If at first you dont succeed
try try try again
If at first you do succeed
try not to look surprised

_
"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
John H wrote:
Further to my original reply to Janet,
Now that you state that the unit has a single voltage input of 120 volts
60Hz & consumption of 13w.
Then I make the following suggestion.
The majority (but not all) of our hotels have a multi country plug

accepted
110v power outlet
in their bathrooms/shower area etc.

This outlet is for low wattage appliances only.

This outlet is normally for shavers, but the small wattage (13W) of your
battery charger should be
OK for using that plug, as most electric shavers are in excess of that
wattage.

It sounds like you are bringing the unit anyway for whilst you are on a
cruise,
so try it in the hotel outlet. (assuming you are using hotels in Aust.)


I will take the little battery charger with me. I'm also packing several
changes of non-rechargeable batteries. The camera uses 4 AA batteries. I
don't know if they sell the same kind of AA batteries in Australia so
I'll just bring my own along. This is my first trip outside of North
America that I was not journeying on a cruise ship. I know the
electricity in Canada and Mexico would work, but Australia is a
different continent g

I did check the web sites of the 3 hotels we will be staying at and none
of them gave any information about electricity. They seem to be pretty
upscale establishments. In Sydney it's the Grace Hotel, at Ayers Rock
it's Desert Gardens Hotel and at Cairns it's Mantra Treetops Resort.
There is lots of information about amenities but nothing about

electricity.

PS: I can't wait to fill the tub and watch the water circle the drain in
the opposite direction g

With deepest appreciation for all y'all's assistance,

Janet

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life



  #10  
Old September 21st, 2007, 10:42 AM posted to rec.travel.australia+nz
kangaroo16
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 222
Default Electricity Question

On Thu, 20 Sep 2007 18:37:39 -0500, Janet Wilder
wrote in
:

kangaroo16 wrote:
On Thu, 20 Sep 2007 17:28:45 +0930, "John H"
wrote in
:

Hi Janet,
Cairns like rest of Australia is 240 volts US is 110 volts.
SO if your appliance is shown as multi voltage ie 110 - 240 then all you
will need is an adapter plug to go from US two round pin horizontally in
line TO the Australian 3 pin.


Essentially correct, but US voltage is a nominal 110-220 volts
RMS at 60 Hertz [ cycle] , and uses a non polarized plug with
two vertical flat pins.

| |

Australia is a nominal 220-240 volt, 50 Hertz, uses a three pin
polarized plug with two angled flat plugs for active and neutral,
and a longer flat pin for a safety earth or "ground" in US.

/ \

|
Lots of chargers are multi voltage so you may indeed be OK for the voltage
situation
Have a look at this site for the plug shape
http://www.accesscomms.com.au/Reference/powerplug.htm
If you cant buy an adaptor in US then you should be able to buy one in
Cairns (at least at the airport if not the town).regards
John H


I would agree with the "should be able to", but that doesn't mean
you actually "will be able to" :-) It might be more convenient
and probably cheaper to buy one in the USA.

Some tourists seem to assume that an "adaptor" plug changes the
voltage, which it doesn't. Make sure the power supply on the
appliance you intend to use has a switch to change the voltage
from 240 volts to 120 volts, and remember to switch to proper
voltage before plugging it in!

Have heard of tourists forgetting to switch an electric razor to
the 220-240 volt range then trying to use it. The results can
be both spectacular and hazardous.

Admittedly, this probably happens more often when someone
assumes the voltage is the same in Australia and the US and
simply bends the blades of a US appliance at an angle to fit
an Australian outlet. This is not advisable.

So what if Janet's charger doesn't have a voltage change switch?
In that case, she would have to find an adapter that includes a
transformer, or buy a 240 volt charger to charge her batteries at
the proper low voltage and polarity.

Am sure if she takes her charger down to a camera store in the
USA, or checks the net, she can get more info.

I don't expect that US tourists would bring a portable TV set on
a trip, but if so, it won't work in Australia. The US uses the
obsolete NTSC standard rather than PAL used here. Channel
allocations are also different.

If bringing a mobile phone, they should check if it will work
here.

Incidentally, on a different topic, currency rates constantly
change. Radio news at 7.08 AM here says that due to loss of
value in US$ it is on a par with Canadian dollar for the first
time in 30 years. As to Aussie dollar:

At the moment
Live rates at 2007.09.20 21:13:37 UTC
1.00 USD 1.16020 AUD
United States Dollars Australia Dollars
1 USD = 1.16020 AUD 1 AUD = 0.861921 USD
http://www.xe.com/ucc/convert.cgi

Cheers,
kangaroo16
[I usually post on misc.immigration Australia+ NZ.]



"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
Will I need an electricity adapter in Cairns and at Ayers Rock to plug in
my battery charger for the rechargeable batteries for my camera? The
charger is United States-flavor electric.

TIA


I'm rather electrically challenged but I think I managed to figure
things out.

I looked at my charger. It has 2 plugs. It will work off 12V, like a
lighter in an automobile with the sausage-shaped plug and regular
electricity with one of those boxy converter plugs. The "input" is 120V
AC, 60Hz 13W and "output" 12V DC 500mA. It does not have a "voltage
switch" I bought it in WalMart two years ago with 4 rechargeable
batteries for under $20, so I wouldn't expect it would be so fancy.


Well, if the "batteries" are rechargeable, they are probably
either nickel/cadmium or the newer NiMH [nickel/metal hydride]
cells.

If it uses standard "AA" or "AAA" size cells, no particular
problem. You could either charge them with a congenial
car battery with a limiting resistor, to control the current.

If this is so, you could probably get someone charge them off a
standard car battery which is 12 volts at a few hundred amps.

NOTE: Don't try this with tourist buses or trucks which may well
have 24 volt systems.

If the camera directly uses "AA" or "AAA" cells your instruction
book should tell you if you can use conventional "alkaline"
non-rechargeable cells of these sizes.

If uses either of these, again no particular problem. You would
be able to get a 240 volt AC charger to charge either of these
here.

However, I would consider your "best shot" is to go to a camera
store, explain that you are going to Australia, and ask them for
their "expert" advice when your only choice of charging is from
12 volts DC or 240 volts a.dc.

It isn't really all that difficult.

For instance, I have a "mini mag light" pocket torch [or
"flashlight"] that uses 2 "AA" size cells.

I could use two conventional "AA" zinc/carbon cells, but they
would have limited life. Usually use "alkaline energizers",
Mn02, cells.

If I wanted to use rechargable cells, would use either Ni/Cd
[nickel/cadmium cells] or the newer metal hydride cells,
designated as "NiMh".

Both are rechargeable, by several means, including solar
chargers.

Your instruction book for the camera should tell you what
it requires for operation, in terms of voltage and amperage.

Cars in Australia generally have a 12 volt D.C. battery. So if
you rent a car, your problem is solved. Even if you don't rent
one, am sure that someone will be willing to charge your battery
pack for you.

Firstly, if a 12 volt DC supply, all that is required is an
inbuilt resistor to limit the current to 500 ma.

Although trucks and tourist buses may have a 24 volt supply, so
beware of this. The resistor value would vary.

I cheerfully admit that I don't know much about the power supply
for cameras.

If the camera requires 12 volts at 500 ma [500 milliamperes] to
charge, then it presumably can be operated off a cell pack that
delivers about 1.2 volts per cell.

Does your instruction book say that you can use conventional
zinc/carbon cells which provide 1.5 volts each, six of which will
provide 12 volts?

Or "alkaline energizer" cells which will do it? [They have
lower internal resistance] Or rechargeable nickel/cadmium cells
in series, that provide enough voltage to operate the camera?
[Due to lower internal resistance]

In other words, does the camera directly require a power source
that provide enough amperage at the required voltage.

Not to charge its internal cells, whatever they might be, but to
directly operate it?

As far as I'm concerned, the easiest thing for you to do is take
your camera into a photo shop, tell them that you want the
easiest and cheapest solution for your problem, then let drop the
fact that you are coming to Australia where the standard voltage
is 220-240 volts R.M.S. at 50 Hz and you want a recommendation!

Hopefully this post will be helpful to you and others.

Cheers,
Kangaroo16



I don't think my charger will work even with an adapter. I'd best bring
extra batteries (assuming the TSA will let me pack them g)

We only spend 6 days on land in Australia then we go on a cruise ship to
sail to Melbourne then over to New Zealand for a sail around the
islands. I know from prior cruises that the charger will work aboard ship.

Thank you all for your help. Having enough extra batteries will assure
me that I'll be able to take many pictures of Australia.

Janet

 




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