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Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 12th, 2012, 02:15 AM posted to rec.travel.asia,rec.travel.air
[email protected]
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Posts: 253
Default Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?

Are there any rules that say drinks purchased airside cannot be
brought on board? Should passengers generally be aware of this
prohibition? Or does this only apply to nonalcoholic beverages
purchased from the airside vendors, while the clearly flammable
liquors and performs purchased from the duty-free shops are allowed?

When we boarded our ICN to SFO flight, we were told that the US
government (presumably the TSA) had reached across the Pacific Ocean
demanded an additional security screening at the Seoul airport. Many
people had the drinks that they had purchased airside confiscated.
Everyone claimed that they thought these beverages, some still in
sealed packages, were allowed with their carryon luggage. At the same
time, other passengers were allowed to add their duty-free purchases
to things they carried on board; most of these contained alcohol and
clearly were hazardous materials.

If clearly hazardous liquids were allowed in large quantites, why
would they prohibit liquids that were probably innocuous? How would
they react to motherís milk or baby formula?

This kind of arrogance coupled with the obviously illogical and
inconsistent application of some secret rules can only reinforce the
TSAís well-earned reputation.
  #2  
Old February 12th, 2012, 02:33 AM posted to rec.travel.asia,rec.travel.air
John Levine
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Posts: 176
Default Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?

Are there any rules that say drinks purchased airside cannot be
brought on board?


No, but that doesn't keep minor airport officals from claiming
that there are.

R's,
John
  #4  
Old February 12th, 2012, 02:58 PM posted to rec.travel.asia,rec.travel.air
Fly Guy
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Posts: 193
Default Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?

" wrote:

Are there any rules that say drinks purchased airside cannot be
brought on board?


Normally, anything bought airside can be brought on a plane.

Only if there is additional screening at the gate could they even be in
a position to detect objects or materials that they don't want you to
take on the plane.

Was there such screening (like a metal-detection arch and x-ray scanner
for hand luggage) located right at the gate?

Should passengers generally be aware of this prohibition?


If you are airside and as you walk around between the gates and the
retail stores, and you notice there is screening equipments located at
the gates (and the gate areas themselves are partitioned off as sealed
rooms) then I'd be very suspicious as to what I could buy in the airside
area and be able to carry with me to the plane.

I don't travel to these wierd-ass places in asia to know what their
airside facilities and proceedures look like.

Or does this only apply to nonalcoholic beverages purchased from
the airside vendors, while the clearly flammable liquors and performs
purchased from the duty-free shops are allowed?


My guess is that they're implimenting a general "liquids" ban at the
gate, which makes no distinction between a glass bottle of liquor vs a
plastic bottle of water/juice/soda.

bill wrote:

There are in India.

You were talking about India weren't you?


He was talking about his experience at ICN - Incheon (south korea).

The OP (jfeng) should be more clear as to exactly what he experienced.

Normally, duty free is brought to the jetway and is allowed to be
carried onto the plane in such circumstances.

The way I read the story, it sounds like people had their carry-on
searched (at the gate? On the jetway?) while duty free was delivered to
them at the jetway in the normal fashion and they were allowed to bring
this on the plane.

The OP was wondering why a non-duty-free liquid beverage (presumably
non-alcoholic and therefore "non-hazardous") would be taken from them,
while the duty-free alcohol (possibly hazardous?) was allowed on-board.

My answer would be that consumable alcohol is not considered dangerous
and there is no distinction being made on that basis in this case.

The distinction being made is that duty free alcohol is more
"controlled" within the airside area, and is not in the possession of
the traveller until he's at the jetway.

That, plus there'd be a lot of really ****ed-off people if their duty
free was confiscated at the gate.

All these issues aside, I say that this whole ban on liquids is a joke
and always has been.

Just another layer of security-theater and additional aggrivation and
inconveinence for the flying public.
  #5  
Old February 12th, 2012, 06:48 PM posted to rec.travel.asia,rec.travel.air
Alfred Molon[_6_]
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Posts: 988
Default Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?

In article , Fly Guy says...
All these issues aside, I say that this whole ban on liquids is a joke
and always has been.


And there has never been a single case in which liquids were used for a
terrorist attack. The London incident which triggered this paranoia
turned out to be a false alarm.
--

Alfred Molon
http://www.molon.de - Photos of Asia, Africa and Europe
  #6  
Old February 12th, 2012, 07:43 PM posted to rec.travel.asia,rec.travel.air
[email protected]
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Posts: 253
Default Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?

On Feb 12, 5:58*am, Fly Guy wrote:
Was there such screening (like a metal-detection arch and x-ray scanner
for hand luggage) located right at the gate?

There were no metal detectors or x-ray machines for this security
check. We were told at the beginning of boarding the the US
governement had demanded additional screening, that we might have to
take off our shoes, and they thanked us in advance for our
cooperation. It was conducted at the entrance to the movable jetway
(int the "lobby" down the steps from the boarding gate) by humans who
rummaged through our bags.

Should passengers generally be aware of this prohibition?


If you are airside and as you walk around between the gates and the
retail stores, and you notice there is screening equipments located at
the gates (and the gate areas themselves are partitioned off as sealed
rooms) then I'd be very suspicious as to what I could buy in the airside
area and be able to carry with me to the plane.

There was no earlier warning. I thinkg the passengers would not have
been as annoyed if we had been given sufficient warning of the
additional restrictions so we could make some personal adjustments.

I don't travel to these wierd-ass places in asia to know what their
airside facilities and proceedures look like.

INC is a very modern airport, more up-to-date than SFO, SJC, or many
other US airports.

Or does this only apply to nonalcoholic beverages purchased from
the airside vendors, while the clearly flammable liquors and performs
purchased from the duty-free shops are allowed?


My guess is that they're implimenting a general "liquids" ban at the
gate, which makes no distinction between a glass bottle of liquor vs a
plastic bottle of water/juice/soda.

There were at least ten inspectors, all enforcing this beverage ban.
It probably was not the decision of a single agent., and looks like it
came from some higher authority. Unless there is some compelling
evidence otherwise, I am wiling to believe that it was probably at the
specific direction of the TSA; after all, losing our drinks was the
only visible effect of this security check.


bill wrote:
You were talking about India weren't you?


He was talking about his experience at ICN - Incheon (south korea).

The OP (jfeng) should be more clear as to exactly what he experienced.

I thought I was sufficiently exact and precise. If you have access to
the internet, translating the airport codes is not very difficult.
Also, I do not believe there are direct flights from India to SFO (I
know I could look it up, but I expect to be corrected if I am wrong).

The way I read the story, it sounds like people had their carry-on
searched (at the gate? *On the jetway?) while duty free was delivered to
them at the jetway in the normal fashion and they were allowed to bring
this on the plane.

Yes. I like to think that I write precisely (that is, little room for
misinterpretation of my intent).


The OP was wondering why a non-duty-free liquid beverage (presumably
non-alcoholic and therefore "non-hazardous") would be taken from them,
while the duty-free alcohol (possibly hazardous?) was allowed on-board.

My answer would be that consumable alcohol is not considered dangerous
and there is no distinction being made on that basis in this case.

Most hard liquors are flammable. Snootier restaurants sometimes do
this with desserts. Some people consumed all or parts of their drinks
in front of the inspectors, thereby demonstrating the potability of
the liquids.

The distinction being made is that duty free alcohol is more
"controlled" within the airside area, and is not in the possession
of the traveller until he's at the jetway.

In my original post, I meant to also say "perfume". I will blame this
on the spell checker.

That, plus there'd be a lot of really ****ed-off people if their duty
free was confiscated at the gate.

If they were to be logically consistent, the TSA could have instructed
the duty-free shops to process refunds for all of the purchases of
potentailly hazardous liquids and deliver those refunds on the
jetway. Of course, nobody ever accursed the TSA of being logical or
consistent. It really shows that they would rather **** off the
passengers than the owners of the duty-free stores.
  #7  
Old February 12th, 2012, 07:51 PM posted to rec.travel.asia,rec.travel.air
[email protected]
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Posts: 253
Default Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?

On Feb 12, 9:48*am, Alfred Molon wrote:
In article , Fly Guy says...

All these issues aside, I say that this whole ban on liquids is a joke
and always has been.


And there has never been a single case in which liquids were used for a
terrorist attack. The London incident which triggered this paranoia
turned out to be a false alarm.
--

Alfred Molonhttp://www.molon.de- Photos of Asia, Africa and Europe

If the prohibitiobns were based on facts, they would inspect our
underwear and they would not allow woment to wear brassieres (think
the Chechen Black Widows). They would probably also be digitally
inspecting our body cavities.

In additin, the TSA taught everyone how to make powerful liquid bombs.
  #8  
Old February 12th, 2012, 11:34 PM posted to rec.travel.asia,rec.travel.air
DevilsPGD[_4_]
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Posts: 33
Default Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?

In the last episode of
,
" said:

Are there any rules that say drinks purchased airside cannot be
brought on board? Should passengers generally be aware of this
prohibition? Or does this only apply to nonalcoholic beverages
purchased from the airside vendors, while the clearly flammable
liquors and performs purchased from the duty-free shops are allowed?

When we boarded our ICN to SFO flight, we were told that the US
government (presumably the TSA) had reached across the Pacific Ocean
demanded an additional security screening at the Seoul airport. Many
people had the drinks that they had purchased airside confiscated.
Everyone claimed that they thought these beverages, some still in
sealed packages, were allowed with their carryon luggage. At the same
time, other passengers were allowed to add their duty-free purchases
to things they carried on board; most of these contained alcohol and
clearly were hazardous materials.

If clearly hazardous liquids were allowed in large quantites, why
would they prohibit liquids that were probably innocuous? How would
they react to motherís milk or baby formula?


They would exempt it, similar to what would happen if you labeled a
couple bags of fluid as saline:

http://www.schneier.com/news-072.html

This kind of arrogance coupled with the obviously illogical and
inconsistent application of some secret rules can only reinforce the
TSAís well-earned reputation.


According to
http://info.publicintelligence.net/F..._Providers.pdf
you are showing potential indicators of terrorist/criminal activity.
Please report to the nearest FBI office to prove your innocence.

Also don't forget to enjoy your patdowns from now on, lest you once
again demonstrate your terrorist indicators in public:
http://www.infowars.com/not-enjoying...ious-activity/

--
It's always darkest before dawn. So if you're going to
steal your neighbor's newspaper, that's the time to do it.
  #9  
Old February 13th, 2012, 12:25 AM posted to rec.travel.asia,rec.travel.air
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 253
Default Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?

On Feb 12, 2:34*pm, DevilsPGD wrote:
Also don't forget to enjoy your patdowns from now on, lest you once
again demonstrate your terrorist indicators in public:
http://www.infowars.com/not-enjoying...a-suspicious-a...

Once, when I got a patdown, I made pleasurable noises (quiet ahhhs and
moans). The TSA guy got really upset, and on the basis of my
appearing to enjoy the experience, he threatened to have me arrested
and permanently banned from flying. I take this to mean that he
intended that screening be unpleasant. and he was frustrated at
failing this time.
  #10  
Old February 13th, 2012, 02:42 AM posted to rec.travel.asia,rec.travel.air
Chris Blunt[_2_]
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Posts: 171
Default Beverages purchased airside banned from carry-on?

On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 18:48:07 +0100, Alfred Molon
wrote:

In article , Fly Guy says...
All these issues aside, I say that this whole ban on liquids is a joke
and always has been.


And there has never been a single case in which liquids were used for a
terrorist attack. The London incident which triggered this paranoia
turned out to be a false alarm.


On a recent trip I bought a bottle of XO Cognac while I was away and
had drunk about half of it before the time came to go home. I realised
I wouldn't be allowed to take the remaining half bottle back with me
on the flight, but found a way around that problem. I saved a few of
the Actimel pro-biotic yogurt drinks we had for breakfast and filled
six of them with the remaining alcohol. They detected them at the
security checkpoint, but because each bottle was 100ml in size I was
allowed to take them all on board the aircraft.

Had that same quantity of liquid been in one bottle it would have been
refused. What sense does that make?


Chris
 




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