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on the subject of airports..



 
 
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  #11  
Old September 10th, 2013, 03:19 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Erick T. Barkhuis[_3_]
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Posts: 180
Default on the subject of airports..

Josef Kleber:

[...]
Furthermore they called his father/mother and asked for a
description1 :-)


In my case, that would require at least some spiritual effort, aber I
can see the picture now.
Thanks.
  #12  
Old September 10th, 2013, 05:27 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Josef Kleber
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Posts: 87
Default on the subject of airports..

Am 10.09.2013 17:57, schrieb Martin:
On 10 Sep 2013 12:06:37 GMT, "Erick T. Barkhuis"
2. In Germany, germans need to posess, not carry, an ID

What's the rule for residents of dutch nationality in Germany?
I can't seem to find anything on that.


If you are British in Germany
https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/germany
"Carry your passport with you at all times. German police have the
right to ask to see identification."

I assume the same applies if you are Dutch.


The same even applies if you are german! ;-) But, with the police having
the right to see an ID does not mean you have to carry an ID.
Furthermore, the police needs a reason for asking for your ID.

So the british government gives a good advice to avoid trouble. In the
context of a law seminar, it's wrong!

Josef

  #13  
Old September 10th, 2013, 06:44 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Josef Kleber
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Posts: 87
Default on the subject of airports..

Am 10.09.2013 18:43, schrieb Martin:
On Tue, 10 Sep 2013 18:27:07 +0200, Josef Kleber
wrote:

Am 10.09.2013 17:57, schrieb Martin:
On 10 Sep 2013 12:06:37 GMT, "Erick T. Barkhuis"
2. In Germany, germans need to posess, not carry, an ID

What's the rule for residents of dutch nationality in Germany?
I can't seem to find anything on that.

If you are British in Germany
https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/germany
"Carry your passport with you at all times. German police have the
right to ask to see identification."

I assume the same applies if you are Dutch.


The same even applies if you are german! ;-) But, with the police having
the right to see an ID does not mean you have to carry an ID.
Furthermore, the police needs a reason for asking for your ID.

So the british government gives a good advice to avoid trouble. In the
context of a law seminar, it's wrong!


Assuming the police have a reason to ask for ID the British government
is right.


"Carry your passport with you at all times." is wrong. That's a good
advice for practical reasons, but no arrest, no ticket, no nothing if
your passport is in the hotel safe. Just carry to avoid inconvenience or
enjoy german police hospitality! ;-)

Josef



  #14  
Old September 10th, 2013, 11:44 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Tom P[_6_]
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Posts: 563
Default on the subject of airports..

On 10.09.2013 15:41, Erick T. Barkhuis wrote:
Josef Kleber:

Am 10.09.2013 14:06, schrieb Erick T. Barkhuis:
Reading up on this, I noticed two rules, confirmed by several
websites: 1. In the Netherlands, dutch inhabitants need to carry
an ID 2. In Germany, germans need to posess, not carry, an ID

What's the rule for residents of dutch nationality in Germany?


[...]
Pretty much the same as for germans, it seems:

[...]
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ausweispflicht
http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/fr..._2004/__8.html

So you need to posess an ID and prove ID if asked by authorities.


Thanks for this, Josef.

No need to carry, but being hold for hours by police for identity
verification isn't much fun either.


Being held by police doesn't make it any easier to go and get the
passport from the drawer at home, either.



which reminds me of what happened to me some years back. I leave the
house one morning, walk over to the car in the driveway and this police
car suddenly drives up and surrounds me.. I can't quite describe exactly
how one police car can surround you, but they did it. Out jumps a young
police officer and a young police officerette. Is this my car, he wants
to know. It's the moment I've been waiting for all my life. No, it's a
company car, I quip. Let's see your ID. I just walked out of the house
to get some stuff out of the car, it's at home. Where's that. This is my
house. Prove it. This is the house door key, this is the car key, this
one opens the letterbox, this one opens the garage. Silence. Well, we've
had a phone call, and someone reported a suspicious person round here
wearing a green jacket and brown trousers. I look at the police officer
in his German police uniform and then at the officerette, who is now
struggling not to burst out laughing. The officer looks slightly
sheepish. I nodded, thanked him profusely for the information and the
diligence of the police force, and promised I'd keep an eye open for
anyone matching the description. They climb back into the car, the
officerette still struggling with a giggling fit, and the officer
manages to reverse out without hitting anything.


  #15  
Old September 11th, 2013, 01:17 AM posted to rec.travel.europe
Mark Brader
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Posts: 345
Default on the subject of airports..

Tom P.:
which reminds me of what happened to me some years back. I leave the
house one morning, walk over to the car in the driveway and this police
car suddenly drives up and surrounds me...


Okay, now I have to repost this story as told by the late Graeme Thomas,
who posted it in 2004 in another newsgroup. Since it involves passports,
it's even on-topic for the thread:

| I suspect that my worst entanglement with authority happened in France,
| about 15 years ago. I was again travelling with my brother, who is my
| identical twin. The French border guard, noting that our passports were
| almost identical, came to the conclusion that at least one of them was a
| forgery. He summoned a junior guard, and instructed her to keep us
| under armed guard while he phoned in the arrest of these criminals.
|
| The guard lowered her gun as soon as her boss left us, and, laughing,
| advised us not to worry. "He's always doing something like this," she
| said.[1] A couple of minutes later he came slinking back to us,
| returned our passports, and said "You're twins, huh?"[2] The woman
| almost ROFLed.
...
| [1] The conversation was in French.
| [2] In English.

--
Mark Brader "I don't see much sense in that."
Toronto "No, there isn't. But there was *going* to be
when I began it. It's just that something
happened to it on the way." --A.A. Milne

My text in this article is in the public domain.
  #16  
Old September 11th, 2013, 07:51 AM posted to rec.travel.europe
Frank Hucklenbroich
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Posts: 449
Default on the subject of airports..

Am Tue, 10 Sep 2013 18:43:32 +0200 schrieb Martin:

On Tue, 10 Sep 2013 18:27:07 +0200, Josef Kleber
wrote:

So the british government gives a good advice to avoid trouble. In the
context of a law seminar, it's wrong!


Assuming the police have a reason to ask for ID the British government
is right. Even if the police do not have a reason to ask for ID they
will usually think of one.


What risk is bigger, having your pocket with the passport picked or being
asked for the passport by the police while it's safely in the safe at the
hotel room? If someone steals your passport it means definetely more
trouble than being taken to your room by the police. And chances are much
bigger (my wife got her wallet with ID picked once in a shop here in
Cologne, and my son got his walled with ID stolen on a train in England -
things like that happen quite often).

So if you stay at a hotel and you go out for a meal or a drink I would
strongly advice you keep the passport at the safe at your room. As I said,
chances are absolutely low that someone wants to see your papers (unless
you take part in some political demostration or end up in a fight at the
pub).

Regards,

Frank
  #17  
Old September 11th, 2013, 11:12 AM posted to rec.travel.europe
Mark Brader
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 345
Default on the subject of airports..

Frank Hucklenbroich:
What risk is bigger, having your pocket with the passport picked or being
asked for the passport by the police while it's safely in the safe at the
hotel room?


Having the passport slip out of your pocket accidentally.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "No weapons of any kind are allowed on
| White Sands Missile Range" -- U.S. Army
  #18  
Old September 11th, 2013, 12:57 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Tom P[_6_]
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Posts: 563
Default on the subject of airports..

On 11.09.2013 09:00, Martin wrote:
On Wed, 11 Sep 2013 00:44:37 +0200, Tom P wrote:

On 10.09.2013 15:41, Erick T. Barkhuis wrote:
Josef Kleber:

Am 10.09.2013 14:06, schrieb Erick T. Barkhuis:
Reading up on this, I noticed two rules, confirmed by several
websites: 1. In the Netherlands, dutch inhabitants need to carry
an ID 2. In Germany, germans need to posess, not carry, an ID

What's the rule for residents of dutch nationality in Germany?

[...]
Pretty much the same as for germans, it seems:
[...]
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ausweispflicht
http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/fr..._2004/__8.html

So you need to posess an ID and prove ID if asked by authorities.

Thanks for this, Josef.

No need to carry, but being hold for hours by police for identity
verification isn't much fun either.

Being held by police doesn't make it any easier to go and get the
passport from the drawer at home, either.



which reminds me of what happened to me some years back. I leave the
house one morning, walk over to the car in the driveway and this police
car suddenly drives up and surrounds me.. I can't quite describe exactly
how one police car can surround you, but they did it. Out jumps a young
police officer and a young police officerette. Is this my car, he wants
to know. It's the moment I've been waiting for all my life. No, it's a
company car, I quip. Let's see your ID. I just walked out of the house
to get some stuff out of the car, it's at home. Where's that. This is my
house. Prove it. This is the house door key, this is the car key, this
one opens the letterbox, this one opens the garage. Silence. Well, we've
had a phone call, and someone reported a suspicious person round here
wearing a green jacket and brown trousers. I look at the police officer
in his German police uniform and then at the officerette, who is now
struggling not to burst out laughing. The officer looks slightly
sheepish. I nodded, thanked him profusely for the information and the
diligence of the police force, and promised I'd keep an eye open for
anyone matching the description. They climb back into the car, the
officerette still struggling with a giggling fit, and the officer
manages to reverse out without hitting anything.


LOL

I suspect the phone call was a prankster.
  #19  
Old September 11th, 2013, 12:59 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Giovanni Drogo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 811
Default on the subject of airports..

On Wed, 11 Sep 2013, Tom P wrote:

which reminds me of what happened to me some years back. I leave the
house one morning, walk over to the car in the driveway and this
police car...


not about airports, but still travel ... did I never tell this story ?

In the '80s I used to travel a lot Italy to Germany and vv. using night
trains (sleepers, I usually booked a T3 but was almost always alone).
Normally there were no border checks, but once in or around Basel I was
waken up by a couple of German police (and older and a younger one) who
were doing luggage inspection.

I had in my luggage a chestnut cake my mother did (you boil chestnuts,
pass them, mix with a bit of butter, cocoa or chocolate and a bit of
cognac or rhum) ... in the form of a ball of a light brown paste wrapped
in aluminium foil :-)

They wanted to know (very politely) what is was, and I said it was a
Kastanienkuche. The older one wanted to know how was it named (!) in
Italian. I said it had no specific names. He insisted on knowing a
"generic" name, so I said "dolce di castagne". Then, addressing the
younger colleague, he smiled and said "it is as I told you". Then they
wished me good night and left.
  #20  
Old September 11th, 2013, 07:08 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Athel Cornish-Bowden
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Posts: 28
Default on the subject of airports..

On 2013-09-10 10:24:13 +0000, Tom P said:

... for flights inside the Schengen area, is there now a some kind of
agreement that you don't need a passport or an official ID card?
I've noticed recently that on internal flights in Germany I never
needed to show anything other than a boarding card, but I hate dragging
my passport around for no good reason, and I'd hate to be refused
boarding just because I didn't have it with me.


I flew from Paris to Vienna last week, and back again yesterday. In
neither direction did I have to show any evidence at any moment that I
was me. Anyone who knew my booking number could have flown. Mind you, I
wouldn't count on it, even for an internal flight.


--
athel

 




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