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any tips to avoid reliving my recent nightmare ?



 
 
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  #11  
Old March 19th, 2004, 06:18 AM
Dick Locke
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Default any tips to avoid reliving my recent nightmare ?

On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 20:58:08 GMT, mtravelkay wrote:

According to them, they said AS said there was no payment from NW for
the seat.


I puzzled by this whole thread. A person has a ticket for a certain
flight number with an OK status (presumably) how can they refuse
boarding to a passenger because of some internal inter-airline
squabble?

  #12  
Old March 19th, 2004, 07:57 AM
mtravelkay
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Default any tips to avoid reliving my recent nightmare ?


Dick Locke wrote:

On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 20:58:08 GMT, mtravelkay wrote:


According to them, they said AS said there was no payment from NW for
the seat.



I puzzled by this whole thread. A person has a ticket for a certain
flight number with an OK status (presumably) how can they refuse
boarding to a passenger because of some internal inter-airline
squabble?


I can guarantee that if you write a bad check for a plane ticket, the
airline can pull you off the flight no matter what the status said on
your ticket. What appears to have happened, is that NW changed the
flight from one codeshare to another, and the AS agent or the AS PNR
seemed to be confused about what happened and labeled it as NW not
paying for the seat and the seat was still booked. Without further
detail from the poster, who thought Orbitz was NWA, we will probably
never know, but they indicated the flight was changed to anothe carrier
and it is logical that NW would have codeshares on different carriers.

  #13  
Old March 19th, 2004, 08:06 AM
@X.
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Default any tips to avoid reliving my recent nightmare ?

On Tue, 16 Mar 2004 10:11:05 -0600, Beowulf
wrote:

PLEASE help me learn how to avoid this in the future.


Just call to reconfirm at some point before the flight. A few weeks
ago I had a flight out of Bangkok canceled. The airline (EVA)
attempted to contact me but was unable to because they didn't have my
cell phone number in Thailand. Fortunately I reconfirmed the night
before and found out I had been rescheduled on a flight that left two
hours earlier than my original itinerary. No problem at all but it
might have been a major hassle if I had showed up just in time for the
original schedule. Even if there are no cancellations you still never
know if there was an equipment change causing you to loose those seats
you so carefully chose. Calling ahead gives you a chance to straiten
out all those little snags before they turn into last minute crises.
  #14  
Old March 19th, 2004, 08:47 AM
mtravelkay
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Default any tips to avoid reliving my recent nightmare ?



Hilary wrote:

According to them, they said AS said there was no payment from NW for
the seat.

I puzzled by this whole thread. A person has a ticket for a certain
flight number with an OK status (presumably) how can they refuse
boarding to a passenger because of some internal inter-airline
squabble?


I can guarantee that if you write a bad check for a plane ticket, the
airline can pull you off the flight no matter what the status said on
your ticket. What appears to have happened, is that NW changed the
flight from one codeshare to another, and the AS agent or the AS PNR
seemed to be confused about what happened and labeled it as NW not
paying for the seat and the seat was still booked. Without further
detail from the poster, who thought Orbitz was NWA, we will probably
never know, but they indicated the flight was changed to anothe carrier
and it is logical that NW would have codeshares on different carriers.



KL/NW used to use AS for some of their internal flights, but it's much
more restricted this year - perhaps the seat was booked under the old
contract, which allowed the AS codeshare and the gate agent didn't
realise.

Hilary


In this case the poster indicated NW had them leaving later in the day
on a Continental flight. So, NW changed the flights and the OP didn't
check for changes before checking in. Yes, I realize the airline or the
travel agency could have done it, but in the end, if you don't check,
who really has the problems at check in time.

  #15  
Old March 19th, 2004, 04:07 PM
Not the Karl Orff
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Default any tips to avoid reliving my recent nightmare ?

In article
,
Hilary wrote:

KL/NW used to use AS for some of their internal flights, but it's much
more restricted this year - perhaps the seat was booked under the old
contract, which allowed the AS codeshare and the gate agent didn't
realise.


They were still codesharing on AS and QX flights late last year for
earlier this
  #16  
Old March 19th, 2004, 08:03 PM
Ulf Kutzner
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Default any tips to avoid reliving my recent nightmare ?

mtravelkay schrieb:

Ulf Kutzner wrote:

Why? If I have a NW ticket for a NW flight number, they should accept
it. Fullstop.
A ticket is a ticket is a ticket. True or false?


It sounds like it was a NW ticket for an NW flight number on a AS code
share. This means it was probably an AS plane with an AS flight number,
that also had an NW flight number.

According to them, they said AS said there was no payment from NW for
the seat.


My guess is that as soon as they put a codeshare on the flight they say
it is commercially run by each of the codesharing carriers, althought
technically run by only one oft them.

Regards, ULF
  #17  
Old March 19th, 2004, 08:05 PM
Ulf Kutzner
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Posts: n/a
Default any tips to avoid reliving my recent nightmare ?

mtravelkay schrieb:

I puzzled by this whole thread. A person has a ticket for a certain
flight number with an OK status (presumably) how can they refuse
boarding to a passenger because of some internal inter-airline
squabble?


I can guarantee that if you write a bad check for a plane ticket, the
airline can pull you off the flight no matter what the status said on
your ticket. What appears to have happened, is that NW changed the
flight from one codeshare to another, and the AS agent or the AS PNR
seemed to be confused about what happened and labeled it as NW not
paying for the seat and the seat was still booked.


If a code share agreement is changed after bookings have been made, they
should respect these bookings.

Regards, ULF
  #18  
Old March 19th, 2004, 08:56 PM
XOR
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Default any tips to avoid reliving my recent nightmare ?

Beowulf wrote in message . ..
On Tue, 16 Mar 2004 17:10:30 +0000, Not the Karl Orff wrote:

In article ,
Beowulf wrote:

On Tue, 16 Mar 2004 16:08:21 +0000, Miss L. Toe wrote:
..
Book directly with the airline concerned, not through a travel agent.

Isn't Orbitz the same as Northwest Airline? But to be honest now I can not


No. Orbitz is owned by a consortium of U.S. airlines. Not sure which.



So if I get an eticket direct from the airline I would be traveling on am
I ok? I just feel from this recent trip that an eticket is not as good as
actual tickets in hand -- with the eticket it seemed like Orbitz.com felt
they could just change my flight schedule on a whim (they did so just
before I left for my trip, and also just before returning), change
carriers (they did this too) -- fricken bull****, made my air travel a
fricking nightmare.


I don't think that's due to an e-ticket. Airlines change flight
schedules all the time, and it doesn't matter *what* kind of ticket
you have, your flight can change. When you book directly with the
airline though, at least IME, they'll call or email you to notify you
of a change. The travel agents don't usually do that. One of the many
reasons I will aim to book directly with the airline unless the
savings is substantial otherwise. That said, I've had better luck with
expedia than travelocity such issues.


There I am, standing at the Alaska Air check-in
counter with my eticket (a fricken paper printer from my printer), and
being told I can not board because NWA has not paid Alaska Air!


Now this sounds strange, but I don't have experience with Alaska Air
to comment.

I think
having actual tickets in hand, and I mean REAL tickets, might be better
than etickets which do not seem to be worth much more than the paper they
are printed on, at least for permanency regarding flight times/carriers.


Nah, has little to do with your e-ticket. The e-ticket IS real,
represents all the paper ticket does. If their reason is as you
stated, wouldn't matter what kind of ticket you had.
 




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