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Planes in Europe



 
 
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  #11  
Old September 25th, 2008, 02:50 AM posted to rec.travel.air
Stephen Farrow
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 126
Default Planes in Europe

Janet Wilder wrote:
Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
I just picked up all of my documents from the travel agent today. We
will be doing 3 flights within Europe. One from Paris to Budapest,
one from Amsterdam to Seville (with a change of plane in Madrid) and
one from Seville to Barcelona.

They are all e-tickets. I won't have a printer so I can't get
boarding passes. Do we just go up to the check-in counter and show
them the copies of the schedules the TA gave us? I'm assuming that
they will not speak English.


The check-in agents will almost certainly speak some English.

Of course, if *you* had any manners, you'd try to learn at least a few
phrases of French, Spanish, Dutch and Hungarian before your trip. You
are visiting their countries, so it behoves you to at least try and
speak a little of their languages.


I do have manners.


That's debatable, given that you didn't appear to be prepared to meet
people in the countries you plan to visit halfway by learning a few
words of their languages.

I also have a program on CD with French, Spanish,
German and Italian, and I've been trying to learn from it for 6 months.
Unfortunately, I'm not very good at remembering what I've learned.


Then buy a phrase book and refer to it as you go, rather than fretting
over the possibility that people in other countries won't speak English
(which, at airport check-in desks in Europe, they most likely will
anyway). You don't need to be fluent in each language. You just need to
make some effort. All you need to remember are a few simple words and
phrases. It's *incredibly* arrogant and rude to visit a country without
learning at least a little of the language - and "I'm not very good at
it" is no excuse.

--

Stephen
  #12  
Old September 25th, 2008, 04:38 AM posted to rec.travel.air
Janet Wilder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 439
Default Planes in Europe

Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
I just picked up all of my documents from the travel agent today. We
will be doing 3 flights within Europe. One from Paris to Budapest,
one from Amsterdam to Seville (with a change of plane in Madrid) and
one from Seville to Barcelona.

They are all e-tickets. I won't have a printer so I can't get
boarding passes. Do we just go up to the check-in counter and show
them the copies of the schedules the TA gave us? I'm assuming that
they will not speak English.

The check-in agents will almost certainly speak some English.

Of course, if *you* had any manners, you'd try to learn at least a
few phrases of French, Spanish, Dutch and Hungarian before your trip.
You are visiting their countries, so it behoves you to at least try
and speak a little of their languages.


I do have manners.


That's debatable, given that you didn't appear to be prepared to meet
people in the countries you plan to visit halfway by learning a few
words of their languages.

I also have a program on CD with French, Spanish, German and Italian,
and I've been trying to learn from it for 6 months. Unfortunately, I'm
not very good at remembering what I've learned.


Then buy a phrase book and refer to it as you go, rather than fretting
over the possibility that people in other countries won't speak English
(which, at airport check-in desks in Europe, they most likely will
anyway). You don't need to be fluent in each language. You just need to
make some effort. All you need to remember are a few simple words and
phrases. It's *incredibly* arrogant and rude to visit a country without
learning at least a little of the language - and "I'm not very good at
it" is no excuse.

So sorry I disappoint you. I do speak a little French and my DH speaks
a little German and Spanish, but we aren't comfortable enough to try
conversing in it. That's why I wanted to get our boarding passes ahead
of time.

It's possible you were so interested in flailing me for being an Ugly
American that you missed my initial query about getting boarding passes
printed while traveling. If that's the case, then I forgive your
arrogant attitude. If it's not the case then kindly STFU. I have better
qualified critics than you.



--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
  #13  
Old September 25th, 2008, 05:12 AM posted to rec.travel.air
Stephen Farrow
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 126
Default Planes in Europe

Janet Wilder wrote:
Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
I just picked up all of my documents from the travel agent today.
We will be doing 3 flights within Europe. One from Paris to
Budapest, one from Amsterdam to Seville (with a change of plane in
Madrid) and one from Seville to Barcelona.

They are all e-tickets. I won't have a printer so I can't get
boarding passes. Do we just go up to the check-in counter and show
them the copies of the schedules the TA gave us? I'm assuming that
they will not speak English.

The check-in agents will almost certainly speak some English.

Of course, if *you* had any manners, you'd try to learn at least a
few phrases of French, Spanish, Dutch and Hungarian before your
trip. You are visiting their countries, so it behoves you to at
least try and speak a little of their languages.


I do have manners.


That's debatable, given that you didn't appear to be prepared to meet
people in the countries you plan to visit halfway by learning a few
words of their languages.

I also have a program on CD with French, Spanish, German and Italian,
and I've been trying to learn from it for 6 months. Unfortunately,
I'm not very good at remembering what I've learned.


Then buy a phrase book and refer to it as you go, rather than fretting
over the possibility that people in other countries won't speak
English (which, at airport check-in desks in Europe, they most likely
will anyway). You don't need to be fluent in each language. You just
need to make some effort. All you need to remember are a few simple
words and phrases. It's *incredibly* arrogant and rude to visit a
country without learning at least a little of the language - and "I'm
not very good at it" is no excuse.

So sorry I disappoint you. I do speak a little French and my DH speaks
a little German and Spanish, but we aren't comfortable enough to try
conversing in it. That's why I wanted to get our boarding passes ahead
of time.

It's possible you were so interested in flailing me for being an Ugly
American that you missed my initial query about getting boarding passes
printed while traveling.


I didn't miss it. In fact, I did point out that check-in agents in major
European airports will most likely be able to speak English (which means
you wouldn't necessarily need to get your boarding passes printed out in
advance). Perhaps you were so intent on taking offense that you missed it.

And the rest of your (overly defensive) response misses the point: you
will have a better time if you try and speak a little of the local
languages. You will get better service. People will be friendlier if you
make the effort to speak a little of their language. You don't need to
be fluent enough to hold a complete conversation. You need to learn a
few words and phrases, stop worrying about making mistakes, and jump in.
For a start, the best way to learn a language is to *use* a language - I
promise you that you will learn more trying to speak even very limited
French or Spanish or whatever while you're on vacation than you will
studying the language in abstract from a CD-Rom. And if you make
mistakes, you make mistakes. The world won't come to an end if you try
ordering a coffee or a meal in French or Spanish and you get it slightly
wrong, and people will appreciate your making the attempt. But to
perpetuate the "ugly American" stereotype by making no attempt at all to
speak the local language while you're in a foreign country is, yes, both
arrogant and rude (which I guess, since your response to me was to tell
me to STFU, probably fits you like a glove).

--

Stephen

You know? Recapture your godhood and unleash Armageddon, and all of a
sudden everyone wants to be a part of the inner circle.
  #14  
Old September 25th, 2008, 08:36 AM posted to rec.travel.air
mrtravel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 458
Default Planes in Europe

Janet Wilder wrote:

I just picked up all of my documents from the travel agent today. We
will be doing 3 flights within Europe. One from Paris to Budapest, one
from Amsterdam to Seville (with a change of plane in Madrid) and one
from Seville to Barcelona.

They are all e-tickets. I won't have a printer so I can't get boarding
passes. Do we just go up to the check-in counter and show them the
copies of the schedules the TA gave us? I'm assuming that they will not
speak English.


Why would you assume they don't speak English?
The internet is all over Europe, it's not like your hotels won't have
printers.

Show up at the counter with the flight number, and you should be fine.
  #15  
Old September 25th, 2008, 08:40 AM posted to rec.travel.air
mrtravel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 458
Default Planes in Europe

mul wrote:

I just picked up all of my documents from the travel agent today. We will
be doing 3 flights within Europe. One from Paris to Budapest, one from
Amsterdam to Seville (with a change of plane in Madrid) and one from
Seville to Barcelona.

They are all e-tickets. I won't have a printer so I can't get boarding
passes. Do we just go up to the check-in counter and show them the copies
of the schedules the TA gave us? I'm assuming that they will not speak
English.

TIA,
--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life



English is widely spoken in the EU,most especialy in Holland,,less so in
France,,
But i doubt you will have any problems
Mul



English will be available at all of the locations indicated, without a
problem. Of course, the OP might actually attempt the language of the
country are in. After all, all they need for check in is the flight
number and to make sure they go to the right destination.
  #16  
Old September 25th, 2008, 08:43 AM posted to rec.travel.air
mrtravel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 458
Default Planes in Europe

Janet Wilder wrote:



So sorry I disappoint you. I do speak a little French and my DH speaks
a little German and Spanish, but we aren't comfortable enough to try
conversing in it. That's why I wanted to get our boarding passes ahead
of time.


It's not like you need to make a profeesional speech. All you are trying
to do is tell them you are on a specific flight or going to a specific
destination, and hand them you passport. They will figure it out even if
your accent isn't perfect.

Stop worrying about it. Americans have been getting boarding passes at
ticket counters for years. It's not like you are going to be the only
English speaker the agents are going to see that day.
  #17  
Old September 25th, 2008, 09:51 AM posted to rec.travel.air
Graham Harrison[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 288
Default Planes in Europe


"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
I just picked up all of my documents from the travel agent today. We
will be doing 3 flights within Europe. One from Paris to Budapest, one
from Amsterdam to Seville (with a change of plane in Madrid) and one
from Seville to Barcelona.

They are all e-tickets. I won't have a printer so I can't get boarding
passes. Do we just go up to the check-in counter and show them the
copies of the schedules the TA gave us? I'm assuming that they will
not speak English.

The check-in agents will almost certainly speak some English.

Of course, if *you* had any manners, you'd try to learn at least a few
phrases of French, Spanish, Dutch and Hungarian before your trip. You
are visiting their countries, so it behoves you to at least try and
speak a little of their languages.


I do have manners.


That's debatable, given that you didn't appear to be prepared to meet
people in the countries you plan to visit halfway by learning a few words
of their languages.

I also have a program on CD with French, Spanish, German and Italian,
and I've been trying to learn from it for 6 months. Unfortunately, I'm
not very good at remembering what I've learned.


Then buy a phrase book and refer to it as you go, rather than fretting
over the possibility that people in other countries won't speak English
(which, at airport check-in desks in Europe, they most likely will
anyway). You don't need to be fluent in each language. You just need to
make some effort. All you need to remember are a few simple words and
phrases. It's *incredibly* arrogant and rude to visit a country without
learning at least a little of the language - and "I'm not very good at
it" is no excuse.

So sorry I disappoint you. I do speak a little French and my DH speaks a
little German and Spanish, but we aren't comfortable enough to try
conversing in it. That's why I wanted to get our boarding passes ahead of
time.

It's possible you were so interested in flailing me for being an Ugly
American that you missed my initial query about getting boarding passes
printed while traveling. If that's the case, then I forgive your arrogant
attitude. If it's not the case then kindly STFU. I have better qualified
critics than you.



--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life


My experience is that even if you only say "hello" in the local language and
then ask "do you speak English" that people (be they check in agents, hotel
staff or just anyone) are almost always helpful and friendly. If they
indicate they don't speak English then mime works surprisingly well and if
that fails just smile, say thank you (preferably in local language) and move
on. Many people see English as something they want to learn and practice
(I'm not sure I think that's a good thing but there you are). I recently
spent 3 weeks in Japan and that seemed to work for me (and actually, I don't
think I ever had to move on).

Turn the problem on its' head. If someone approached you and spoke no
English but did speak French would you refuse to help? You might have to
ask them to speak slowly and repeat a few words but I bet you would do your
best. It's all a matter of give and take. You try their language, they
try yours, smile, mime, be friendly.

  #18  
Old September 25th, 2008, 10:01 AM posted to rec.travel.air
Louis Krupp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default Planes in Europe

Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
Stephen Farrow wrote:
Janet Wilder wrote:
I just picked up all of my documents from the travel agent today.
We will be doing 3 flights within Europe. One from Paris to
Budapest, one from Amsterdam to Seville (with a change of plane in
Madrid) and one from Seville to Barcelona.

They are all e-tickets. I won't have a printer so I can't get
boarding passes. Do we just go up to the check-in counter and show
them the copies of the schedules the TA gave us? I'm assuming
that they will not speak English.

The check-in agents will almost certainly speak some English.

Of course, if *you* had any manners, you'd try to learn at least a
few phrases of French, Spanish, Dutch and Hungarian before your
trip. You are visiting their countries, so it behoves you to at
least try and speak a little of their languages.


I do have manners.

That's debatable, given that you didn't appear to be prepared to meet
people in the countries you plan to visit halfway by learning a few
words of their languages.

I also have a program on CD with French, Spanish, German and
Italian, and I've been trying to learn from it for 6 months.
Unfortunately, I'm not very good at remembering what I've learned.

Then buy a phrase book and refer to it as you go, rather than
fretting over the possibility that people in other countries won't
speak English (which, at airport check-in desks in Europe, they most
likely will anyway). You don't need to be fluent in each language.
You just need to make some effort. All you need to remember are a few
simple words and phrases. It's *incredibly* arrogant and rude to
visit a country without learning at least a little of the language -
and "I'm not very good at it" is no excuse.

So sorry I disappoint you. I do speak a little French and my DH
speaks a little German and Spanish, but we aren't comfortable enough
to try conversing in it. That's why I wanted to get our boarding
passes ahead of time.

It's possible you were so interested in flailing me for being an Ugly
American that you missed my initial query about getting boarding
passes printed while traveling.


I didn't miss it. In fact, I did point out that check-in agents in major
European airports will most likely be able to speak English (which means
you wouldn't necessarily need to get your boarding passes printed out in
advance). Perhaps you were so intent on taking offense that you missed it.

And the rest of your (overly defensive) response misses the point: you
will have a better time if you try and speak a little of the local
languages. You will get better service. People will be friendlier if you
make the effort to speak a little of their language. You don't need to
be fluent enough to hold a complete conversation. You need to learn a
few words and phrases, stop worrying about making mistakes, and jump in.
For a start, the best way to learn a language is to *use* a language - I
promise you that you will learn more trying to speak even very limited
French or Spanish or whatever while you're on vacation than you will
studying the language in abstract from a CD-Rom. And if you make
mistakes, you make mistakes. The world won't come to an end if you try
ordering a coffee or a meal in French or Spanish and you get it slightly
wrong, and people will appreciate your making the attempt. But to
perpetuate the "ugly American" stereotype by making no attempt at all to
speak the local language while you're in a foreign country is, yes, both
arrogant and rude (which I guess, since your response to me was to tell
me to STFU, probably fits you like a glove).


Nice diatribe. I'd say you're the one who's sounding arrogant. I've
made speeches like that myself, back when I thought (1) I knew it all,
or (2) what I did know was important. The years have served to disabuse
me of both notions.

Louis
  #19  
Old September 25th, 2008, 10:52 PM posted to rec.travel.air
Janet Wilder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 439
Default Planes in Europe

Graham Harrison wrote:

My experience is that even if you only say "hello" in the local language
and then ask "do you speak English" that people (be they check in
agents, hotel staff or just anyone) are almost always helpful and
friendly. If they indicate they don't speak English then mime works
surprisingly well and if that fails just smile, say thank you
(preferably in local language) and move on. Many people see English as
something they want to learn and practice (I'm not sure I think that's a
good thing but there you are). I recently spent 3 weeks in Japan and
that seemed to work for me (and actually, I don't think I ever had to
move on).


I have had the same experience traveling in Mexico and Central America.
Most people want to try out their English on us.

Turn the problem on its' head. If someone approached you and spoke no
English but did speak French would you refuse to help? You might have
to ask them to speak slowly and repeat a few words but I bet you would
do your best. It's all a matter of give and take. You try their
language, they try yours, smile, mime, be friendly.


I can't begin to count the number of times I have interpreted for French
Canadians traveling in the US and also in Mexico.

This will be my first trip to Europe. I'm a senior citizen and a little
nervous about it. So shoot me.

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
  #20  
Old September 25th, 2008, 11:38 PM posted to rec.travel.air
S Viemeister[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 407
Default Planes in Europe

Janet Wilder wrote:
Graham Harrison wrote:

My experience is that even if you only say "hello" in the local
language and then ask "do you speak English" that people (be they
check in agents, hotel staff or just anyone) are almost always helpful
and friendly. If they indicate they don't speak English then mime
works surprisingly well and if that fails just smile, say thank you
(preferably in local language) and move on. Many people see English
as something they want to learn and practice (I'm not sure I think
that's a good thing but there you are). I recently spent 3 weeks in
Japan and that seemed to work for me (and actually, I don't think I
ever had to move on).


I have had the same experience traveling in Mexico and Central America.
Most people want to try out their English on us.

Turn the problem on its' head. If someone approached you and spoke
no English but did speak French would you refuse to help? You might
have to ask them to speak slowly and repeat a few words but I bet you
would do your best. It's all a matter of give and take. You try
their language, they try yours, smile, mime, be friendly.


I can't begin to count the number of times I have interpreted for French
Canadians traveling in the US and also in Mexico.

This will be my first trip to Europe. I'm a senior citizen and a little
nervous about it. So shoot me.

You'll do just fine.
You may enjoy it so much that you decide to try it again!
 




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