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Whitby, as seen in 1921



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 4th, 2012, 09:57 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Jack Campin
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Posts: 135
Default Whitby, as seen in 1921

I just spent a week in Whitby for their folk festival. Booked a flat
from an agency we'd used before,and basically knew my way around, so
didn't have that much need for a guidebook. But anyway I brought the
1921 edition of a red cloth Ward Lock guide.

It covered pretty much everything I wanted to know. The one thing it
didn't cover was Dracula. No mention of the book, or of Bram Stoker,
at all. So if you wanted to know where the Goth connection came from
the little red book wasn't going to tell you.

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mobile 07800 739 557 http://www.campin.me.uk Twitter: JackCampin
  #2  
Old September 6th, 2012, 04:32 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
irwell
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Posts: 758
Default Whitby, as seen in 1921

On Tue, 04 Sep 2012 21:57:31 +0100, Jack Campin wrote:

I just spent a week in Whitby for their folk festival. Booked a flat
from an agency we'd used before,and basically knew my way around, so
didn't have that much need for a guidebook. But anyway I brought the
1921 edition of a red cloth Ward Lock guide.

It covered pretty much everything I wanted to know. The one thing it
didn't cover was Dracula. No mention of the book, or of Bram Stoker,
at all. So if you wanted to know where the Goth connection came from
the little red book wasn't going to tell you.


There is an annotated version of Bram Stoker's "Dracula",
probably explains it in there. I read it whilst in hospital,
one of the nurses thought it was an odd choice of a book
to read in a hospital.
  #3  
Old September 6th, 2012, 09:35 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
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Posts: 2,816
Default Whitby, as seen in 1921



Irwell wrote:

There is an annotated version of Bram Stoker's "Dracula",
probably explains it in there. I read it whilst in hospital,
one of the nurses thought it was an odd choice of a book
to read in a hospital.


Oh, I dunno .... seems totally appropriate to me! (The medical
profession being "bloodsuckers" in more ways than one, at least here in
the U.S.) (;-)
  #4  
Old September 6th, 2012, 10:20 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
Erilar
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Posts: 599
Default Whitby, as seen in 1921

"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" wrote:
Irwell wrote:

There is an annotated version of Bram Stoker's "Dracula",
probably explains it in there. I read it whilst in hospital,
one of the nurses thought it was an odd choice of a book
to read in a hospital.


Oh, I dunno .... seems totally appropriate to me! (The medical
profession being "bloodsuckers" in more ways than one, at least here in the U.S.) (;-)



When I have to go to the clinic for a blood test, I have been known to say
I was visiting the vampires 8-)

--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist with iPad
  #5  
Old September 7th, 2012, 09:52 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
JohnT[_8_]
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Posts: 107
Default Whitby, as seen in 1921


"Erilar" wrote in message
...
"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" wrote:
Irwell wrote:

There is an annotated version of Bram Stoker's "Dracula",
probably explains it in there. I read it whilst in hospital,
one of the nurses thought it was an odd choice of a book
to read in a hospital.


Oh, I dunno .... seems totally appropriate to me! (The medical
profession being "bloodsuckers" in more ways than one, at least here in
the U.S.) (;-)



When I have to go to the clinic for a blood test, I have been known to say
I was visiting the vampires 8-)


Very droll. I tell them I have given an armful but I doubt that you know the
significance of that because you will never have heard of Tony Hancock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blood_Donor
--
JohnT

  #6  
Old September 8th, 2012, 09:00 PM posted to rec.travel.europe
mikeos
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Posts: 177
Default Whitby, as seen in 1921

On 07/09/2012 21:52, JohnT wrote:


Very droll. I tell them I have given an armful but I doubt that you know
the significance of that because you will never have heard of Tony Hancock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blood_Donor


Even better watch it here;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pC1-Mrlm3TU

  #9  
Old August 22nd, 2013, 07:47 PM
malickk malickk is offline
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First recorded activity by TravelBanter: Aug 2013
Posts: 5
Default

Whitby have a huge range of attractive and beautiful places and have many activities for all ages. It is one of the most dramatic and atmospheric sites on the Yorkshire Coast.

Last edited by malickk : September 17th, 2013 at 09:43 PM.
 




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