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Notebooks in flight



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 19th, 2008, 05:42 AM posted to rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
Chris Blunt[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 171
Default Notebooks in flight

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 04:42:34 GMT, (John Kulp)
wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 19:01:11 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:42:47 GMT, John Kulp wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 16:13:55 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:00:02 +0100, Alfred Molon wrote:

Why exactly are you not allowed to use a notebook computer during take-
off and landing? The radio power emitted by a notebook should be too
weak to cause any problems to the plane electronics.

One notebook maybe, but 50 to 100 could cause some beat frequency
problems with the avionics.

Baloney. This has been proven to be completely false again and again.


Not asking about your state of mind here.
They, the people who really know, require that all electronic devices
be powered down during the landing and take off phases of the flight.
They don't want to take chances with passenger's electronics that may
not be assembled and tested to FCC/FAA standards, including radiation
hardness.



Sure and cellphones do the same thing according to the same ones that
believe this. Also, having been proven to be completely false. The
reason, as everyone else knows, is to prevent liability for these
things flying around the cabin in case of a sudden stop.


For years the airlines have been telling people to keep their
cellphones switched off at all times while on board the aircraft. Now
that they've found a way to make extra money by allowing passengers to
use their cellphones in flight, these things will suddenly be deemed
quite safe to use.

Chris
  #12  
Old November 19th, 2008, 05:42 AM posted to rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
Chris Blunt[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 171
Default Notebooks in flight

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 19:01:11 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:42:47 GMT, John Kulp wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 16:13:55 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:00:02 +0100, Alfred Molon wrote:

Why exactly are you not allowed to use a notebook computer during take-
off and landing? The radio power emitted by a notebook should be too
weak to cause any problems to the plane electronics.

One notebook maybe, but 50 to 100 could cause some beat frequency
problems with the avionics.


Baloney. This has been proven to be completely false again and again.


Not asking about your state of mind here.
They, the people who really know, require that all electronic devices
be powered down during the landing and take off phases of the flight.
They don't want to take chances with passenger's electronics that may
not be assembled and tested to FCC/FAA standards, including radiation
hardness.


The only "people who really know" are those who have carried out
actual tests, and so far those tests have failed to show any adverse
effects from using notebook computers. Those who make these rules are
"people who don't really know", so they just err on the side of
caution.

Chris
  #13  
Old November 19th, 2008, 06:21 AM posted to rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
Tom P[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 225
Default Notebooks in flight

John Kulp wrote:
On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 19:01:11 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:42:47 GMT, John Kulp wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 16:13:55 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:00:02 +0100, Alfred Molon wrote:

Why exactly are you not allowed to use a notebook computer during take-
off and landing? The radio power emitted by a notebook should be too
weak to cause any problems to the plane electronics.
One notebook maybe, but 50 to 100 could cause some beat frequency
problems with the avionics.
Baloney. This has been proven to be completely false again and again.

Not asking about your state of mind here.
They, the people who really know, require that all electronic devices
be powered down during the landing and take off phases of the flight.
They don't want to take chances with passenger's electronics that may
not be assembled and tested to FCC/FAA standards, including radiation
hardness.



Sure and cellphones do the same thing according to the same ones that
believe this. Also, having been proven to be completely false. The
reason, as everyone else knows, is to prevent liability for these
things flying around the cabin in case of a sudden stop.


Are you saying that they are less dangerous when they are switched off?
And exactly how dangerous is my Nanopod as a flying object?

T.


  #15  
Old November 19th, 2008, 03:49 PM posted to rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
irwell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 758
Default Notebooks in flight

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 13:42:58 +0800, Chris Blunt wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 19:01:11 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:42:47 GMT, John Kulp wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 16:13:55 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:00:02 +0100, Alfred Molon wrote:

Why exactly are you not allowed to use a notebook computer during take-
off and landing? The radio power emitted by a notebook should be too
weak to cause any problems to the plane electronics.

One notebook maybe, but 50 to 100 could cause some beat frequency
problems with the avionics.

Baloney. This has been proven to be completely false again and again.


Not asking about your state of mind here.
They, the people who really know, require that all electronic devices
be powered down during the landing and take off phases of the flight.
They don't want to take chances with passenger's electronics that may
not be assembled and tested to FCC/FAA standards, including radiation
hardness.


The only "people who really know" are those who have carried out
actual tests, and so far those tests have failed to show any adverse
effects from using notebook computers. Those who make these rules are
"people who don't really know", so they just err on the side of
caution.

Chris


Not quite true Chris, just have a look at the NASA website
for information on how 'consumer electronics' have intefered
with avionics systems.
  #16  
Old November 19th, 2008, 03:55 PM posted to rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
irwell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 758
Default Notebooks in flight

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 04:42:34 GMT, John Kulp wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 19:01:11 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:42:47 GMT, John Kulp wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 16:13:55 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:00:02 +0100, Alfred Molon wrote:

Why exactly are you not allowed to use a notebook computer during take-
off and landing? The radio power emitted by a notebook should be too
weak to cause any problems to the plane electronics.

One notebook maybe, but 50 to 100 could cause some beat frequency
problems with the avionics.

Baloney. This has been proven to be completely false again and again.


Not asking about your state of mind here.
They, the people who really know, require that all electronic devices
be powered down during the landing and take off phases of the flight.
They don't want to take chances with passenger's electronics that may
not be assembled and tested to FCC/FAA standards, including radiation
hardness.



Sure and cellphones do the same thing according to the same ones that
believe this. Also, having been proven to be completely false. The
reason, as everyone else knows, is to prevent liability for these
things flying around the cabin in case of a sudden stop.


Weak argument, put away your 10 ounce cell phone, but you can carry on
reading your 2 lb book.
  #17  
Old November 19th, 2008, 03:57 PM posted to rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
irwell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 758
Default Notebooks in flight

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 20:23:15 -0600, Jim Davis wrote:

"PeterL" wrote in message
...
On Nov 18, 3:00 pm, Alfred Molon wrote:
Why exactly are you not allowed to use a notebook computer during take-
off and landing? The radio power emitted by a notebook should be too
weak to cause any problems to the plane electronics.
--

Alfred Molonhttp://www.molon.de- Photos of Asia, Africa and Europe



If they want you to put everything away and store all your stuff under
you seat, why would they then allow you to hold a piece of hardware on
your lap? It may be thrown around in turbulance and hurt someone.


Everything has to be stowed as not to become a deadly flying object in the
event of an accident. The crazy part is, you can have an infant on your
lap.


Don't worry about the infant, watch out for disposable pampers.
  #18  
Old November 19th, 2008, 05:41 PM posted to rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
John Kulp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,535
Default Notebooks in flight

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 13:42:58 +0800, Chris Blunt
wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 19:01:11 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:42:47 GMT, John Kulp wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 16:13:55 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:00:02 +0100, Alfred Molon wrote:

Why exactly are you not allowed to use a notebook computer during take-
off and landing? The radio power emitted by a notebook should be too
weak to cause any problems to the plane electronics.

One notebook maybe, but 50 to 100 could cause some beat frequency
problems with the avionics.

Baloney. This has been proven to be completely false again and again.


Not asking about your state of mind here.
They, the people who really know, require that all electronic devices
be powered down during the landing and take off phases of the flight.
They don't want to take chances with passenger's electronics that may
not be assembled and tested to FCC/FAA standards, including radiation
hardness.


The only "people who really know" are those who have carried out
actual tests, and so far those tests have failed to show any adverse
effects from using notebook computers. Those who make these rules are
"people who don't really know", so they just err on the side of
caution.


As far as this issue is concerned, yes. But not as far as keeping
them from flying around the cabin. That's a valid issue.


Chris


  #19  
Old November 19th, 2008, 05:42 PM posted to rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
John Kulp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,535
Default Notebooks in flight

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 13:42:58 +0800, Chris Blunt
wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 04:42:34 GMT, (John Kulp)
wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 19:01:11 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:42:47 GMT, John Kulp wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 16:13:55 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:00:02 +0100, Alfred Molon wrote:

Why exactly are you not allowed to use a notebook computer during take-
off and landing? The radio power emitted by a notebook should be too
weak to cause any problems to the plane electronics.

One notebook maybe, but 50 to 100 could cause some beat frequency
problems with the avionics.

Baloney. This has been proven to be completely false again and again.

Not asking about your state of mind here.
They, the people who really know, require that all electronic devices
be powered down during the landing and take off phases of the flight.
They don't want to take chances with passenger's electronics that may
not be assembled and tested to FCC/FAA standards, including radiation
hardness.



Sure and cellphones do the same thing according to the same ones that
believe this. Also, having been proven to be completely false. The
reason, as everyone else knows, is to prevent liability for these
things flying around the cabin in case of a sudden stop.


For years the airlines have been telling people to keep their
cellphones switched off at all times while on board the aircraft. Now
that they've found a way to make extra money by allowing passengers to
use their cellphones in flight, these things will suddenly be deemed
quite safe to use.


Hopefully not, or there are going to be lots of fights on board.
  #20  
Old November 19th, 2008, 05:43 PM posted to rec.travel.air,rec.travel.asia
John Kulp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,535
Default Notebooks in flight

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 07:21:55 +0100, Tom P wrote:

John Kulp wrote:
On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 19:01:11 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:42:47 GMT, John Kulp wrote:

On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 16:13:55 -0800, Irwell wrote:

On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 00:00:02 +0100, Alfred Molon wrote:

Why exactly are you not allowed to use a notebook computer during take-
off and landing? The radio power emitted by a notebook should be too
weak to cause any problems to the plane electronics.
One notebook maybe, but 50 to 100 could cause some beat frequency
problems with the avionics.
Baloney. This has been proven to be completely false again and again.
Not asking about your state of mind here.
They, the people who really know, require that all electronic devices
be powered down during the landing and take off phases of the flight.
They don't want to take chances with passenger's electronics that may
not be assembled and tested to FCC/FAA standards, including radiation
hardness.



Sure and cellphones do the same thing according to the same ones that
believe this. Also, having been proven to be completely false. The
reason, as everyone else knows, is to prevent liability for these
things flying around the cabin in case of a sudden stop.


Are you saying that they are less dangerous when they are switched off?
And exactly how dangerous is my Nanopod as a flying object?


Very, if it flew out of your hand and hit someone in the temple.
 




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